Events Calendar

March 2017

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DECONSTRUCTING THE CULTURE OF POST-TRUTH UNDER SLOBODAN MILOŠEVIĆ: MILICA MIĆIĆ DIMOVSKA, HER NOVEL MRENA, AND ITS NEW TRANSLATION AS THE CATARACT

DECONSTRUCTING THE CULTURE OF POST-TRUTH UNDER SLOBODAN MILOŠEVIĆ: MILICA MIĆIĆ DIMOVSKA, HER NOVEL MRENA, AND ITS NEW TRANSLATION AS THE CATARACT

Wednesday, March 22, 2017 - 6:00pm
Location: 
Marshall D. Shulman Seminar Room (1219 International Affairs Building)

Please join the Njegos Endowment for Serbian Language and Culture at Columbia University’s East Central European Center and the Harriman Institute for a lecture by Jasmina LukićProfessor, Department of Gender Studies, Central European University, Budapest, Hungary and Sibelan ForresterSusan W. Lippincott Professor of Modern and Classical Languages and Russian at Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania.

This joint lecture by Forrester and Lukić will shed light on the work of Milica Mićić Dimovska, one of the first women writers in the Balkan literatures to promote a gender perspective in contemporary fiction of the 1980s and 1990s. An engaging storyteller, exceptional stylist, and sharp observer of social life, Mićić Dimovska is also the author of one of the most important novels about the era of Slobodan Milošević. She deconstructs the institutional, cultural and media mechanisms of mass self-deception of the part of the Serbian population that supported Milošević’s prolonged rule. She unmasks the closed system of destabilization of all possible grounds for safe judgment, which produced a situation in which post-truth was effectively introduced in public spaces.

The 2002 novel Mrena, translated into Englsih by Prof. Forrester as The Cataract, was published in 2016, and it will be promoted at the lecture as an exceptional literary piece and a strong critical text that can speak to a number of comparable situations in today's world.

Sibelan Forrester is Susan W. Lippincott Professor of Modern and Classical Languages and Russian at Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania. She has published numerous translations of fiction, folktales, poetry, and scholarly prose from Croatian, Russian and Serbian. Her translation of Mićić Dimovska's novel THE CATARACT was published in 2016, with an introduction by Jasmina Lukić. 

Jasmina Lukić is Professor of Comparative Literature and Gender Studies with the Department of Gender Studies at Central European University in Budapest. In 2014-15 she has been Cornell Visiting Professor with Swarthmore College. Her publications include two monographs, and multiple articles and book chapters in the fields of literary studies, women’s studies and Slavic studies. 

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03/22/2017 - 6:00pm
 
GOING PUBLIC: The Fine Art of Giving Papers

GOING PUBLIC: The Fine Art of Giving Papers

Thursday, March 23, 2017 - 4:00pm
Location: 
709 Hamilton Hall


1.    Listserv (SEELANGS)--Calls for Papers (CFP), Panelist needed...
2.    Conferences--National, Regional, Local
3.    Genre--From written text to oral copy
4.    Visual media--Handouts? Powerpoint?
5.    Performance art


 

The workshop will provide both a basic road map of the territory for newcomers (1&2) 
AND concrete techniques for effective structuring and dynamic delivery (3-5).


                                                                                                                                                                                  It also features hands-on practice converting a brief course paper* into copy for oral delivery--and some practice with the delivery itself.
 

*Paper to be distributed soon.


THURSDAY, MARCH 23
4:10-5:30
709 HAMILTON
 
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03/23/2017 - 4:00pm
 
SOVIET PHOTOMONTAGE: FROM PHOTO-POETRY TO PROPAGANDA

SOVIET PHOTOMONTAGE: FROM PHOTO-POETRY TO PROPAGANDA

Thursday, March 23, 2017 - 5:00pm
Location: 
Common Room, Heyman Center for the Humanities

Please join us for a panel discussion organized by Maria Ratanova exploring the early history of photomontage in the Soviet Russia in its active interaction with the political development. Click here for directions to the Heyman Center.

Note that to access the venue you must provide picture ID and sign in at the security desk.

Panelists:

Jindrich Toman (University of Michigan)

Serguei Oushakine (Princeton University)

Maria Ratanova (Harriman Institute Columbia University)

Aleksandar Bošković (Columbia University)

Discussant: Katherine Reischl (Princeton University)

The panel will explore the early history of photomontage in the Soviet Russia in its active interaction with the political development. The Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 triggered a radical shift in the modernist paradigm, which prompted Russian avant-garde artists to abandon abstract experimentation and turn to the media of photography and photomontage. They created an archive of revolutionary imagery, and after 1924 – a new corpus of memorial photomontages on Lenin. The sheer number and variety of the Constructivists’ photomontages on Lenin and the revolution proves their desire to escape a single, party-imposed, narrative of revolutionary events. The photomontage project was the project of continuous revolution, of changing ideological meanings, and transgressing the boundaries of modern art. The panel will focus in particular on the junction between photomontage and poetry, and explore the concept of avant-garde photo-poetry, as well as El Lissitzky’s concept of the “architecture of a book.”

The panelists with further elaborate on the creation of a visual language of Soviet photomontage in the 1920s and 1930s, in its close interrelationships with the Western avant-garde developments. They will discuss a broader problem of artistic intervention into politics. Can and should art influence political and social development? Does political message destroy the aesthetic component of art? What does it mean when the aesthetic becomes political? 

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03/23/2017 - 5:00pm
 
Highlights From The Yuriy Tarnawsky Manuscript Collection

Highlights From The Yuriy Tarnawsky Manuscript Collection

Thursday, March 23, 2017 - 6:00pm
Location: 
Butler Library, Kempner Gallery

The exhibition, which will last from March 6, 2017 through March 31, 2017 and draws on material from the New York Poetry Group showcases the highlights in the literary and scholarly career of the Ukrainian-American author, literary scholar, and linguist Yuryi Tarnawsky.

Dr. Yuriy Tarnawsky’s literary career spans more than 60 years.  Author of more than three dozen books of poetry, fiction, drama, essays, and translations in Ukrainian and English, he is known as a radical modernist innovator who brought unto American literature the strict attention to form and spirit characteristic of experimental European fiction, in particular in the use of language.

On Thursday, March 23, 2017, at 6:00 p.m. Yuryi Tarnawsky will be reading from his newest books of poetry in Kempner Gallery of the Rare Book and Manuscript Library.  He will be introduced by Dr. Maria-Grazia Bartolini, author of a monograph in Italian on his poetry.  A reception will follow the reading.

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03/23/2017 - 6:00pm
 
SOVIET PHOTOMONTAGE: FROM PHOTO-POETRY TO PROPAGANDA

SOVIET PHOTOMONTAGE: FROM PHOTO-POETRY TO PROPAGANDA

Thursday, March 23, 2017 - 6:00pm
Location: 
Common Room, Heyman Center for the Humanities

Please join us for a panel discussion organized by Maria Ratanova exploring the early history of photomontage in the Soviet Russia in its active interaction with the political development. Click here for directions to the Heyman Center.

Note that to access the venue you must provide picture ID and sign in at the security desk.

Panelists:

Jindrich Toman (University of Michigan)

Serguei Oushakine (Princeton University)

Maria Ratanova (Harriman Institute Columbia University)

Aleksandar Bošković (Columbia University)

Discussant: Katherine Reischl (Princeton University)

The panel will explore the early history of photomontage in the Soviet Russia in its active interaction with the political development. The Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 triggered a radical shift in the modernist paradigm, which prompted Russian avant-garde artists to abandon abstract experimentation and turn to the media of photography and photomontage. They created an archive of revolutionary imagery, and after 1924 – a new corpus of memorial photomontages on Lenin. The sheer number and variety of the Constructivists’ photomontages on Lenin and the revolution proves their desire to escape a single, party-imposed, narrative of revolutionary events. The photomontage project was the project of continuous revolution, of changing ideological meanings, and transgressing the boundaries of modern art. The panel will focus in particular on the junction between photomontage and poetry, and explore the concept of avant-garde photo-poetry, as well as El Lissitzky’s concept of the “architecture of a book.”

The panelists with further elaborate on the creation of a visual language of Soviet photomontage in the 1920s and 1930s, in its close interrelationships with the Western avant-garde developments. They will discuss a broader problem of artistic intervention into politics. Can and should art influence political and social development? Does political message destroy the aesthetic component of art? What does it mean when the aesthetic becomes political? 

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03/23/2017 - 6:00pm
 
Celebrating Recent Work by Liza Knapp and Irina Reyfman

Celebrating Recent Work by Liza Knapp and Irina Reyfman

Friday, March 24, 2017 - 12:15pm
Location: 
Second Floor Common Room, Heyman Center

New Books in the Arts & Sciences
         —panel discussions celebrating recent work by the Columbia Faculty

Anna Karenina and Others: Tolstoy’s Labyrinth of Plots
by Liza Knapp

With its complex structure, Anna Karenina places special demands on readers who must follow multiple plotlines and discern their hidden linkages. In her well-conceived and jargon-free analysis, Liza Knapp offers a fresh approach to understanding how the novel is constructed, how it creates patterns of meaning, and why it is much more than Tolstoy’s version of an adultery story.

Knapp provides a series of readings of Anna Karenina that draw on other works that were critical to Tolstoy’s understanding of the interconnectedness of human lives. Among the texts she considers are The Scarlet Letter, a novel of adultery with a divided plot; Middlemarch, a multiplot novel with neighborly love as its ideal; and Blaise Pascal’s Pensées, which fascinated Tolstoy during his own religious crisis. She concludes with a tour-de-force reading of Mrs. Dalloway that shows Virginia Woolf constructing this novel in response to Tolstoy’s treatment of Anna Karenina and others.

How Russia Learned to Write: Literature and the Imperial Table of Ranks
by Irina Reyfman

​In the eighteenth century, as modern forms of literature began to emerge in Russia, most of the writers producing it were members of the nobility. But their literary pursuits competed with strictly enforced obligations to imperial state service. Unique to Russia was the Table of Ranks, introduced by Emperor Peter the Great in 1722. Noblesse oblige was not just a lofty principle; aristocrats were expected to serve in the military, civil service, or the court, and their status among peers depended on advancement in ranks.

Irina Reyfman illuminates the surprisingly diverse effects of the Table of Ranks on writers, their work, and literary culture in Russia. From Sumarokov and Derzhavin in the eighteenth century through Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, and poets serving in the military in the nineteenth, state service affected the self-images of writers and the themes of their creative output. Reyfman also notes its effects on Russia’s atypical course in the professionalization and social status of literary work.

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03/24/2017 - 12:15pm
 
 
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Acting Out: The Performing Arts in the Humanities Classroom

Acting Out: The Performing Arts in the Humanities Classroom

Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 4:00pm
Location: 
709 Hamilton Hall

Please join us on Wednesday, March 29th, from 4:10 - 5:30 in 709 Hamilton for a teaching workshop: "Acting Out: The Performing Arts in the Humanities Classroom" [see attached poster] 

How can teachers in the humanities classroom use role-play games and the performing arts to engage students with course material, strengthen investment, and activate empathy? Special guest Rebecca Stanton joins us for an interactive workshop; she will introduce us to Barnard's program "Reacting to the Past," an elaborate games and role-play program for undergraduate students. We will then brainstorm some ways to actively incorporate role-playing and performing arts techniques into our own literature, language, and history classrooms!
This event is open to all graduate students and faculty members. Pizza and drinks shall be served!

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03/29/2017 - 4:00pm
 
Joseph Brodsky the Graphic Artist

Joseph Brodsky the Graphic Artist

Wednesday, March 29, 2017 - 4:15pm
Location: 
1219 International Affairs Building

Please join us for a talk with Yuri Leving (Dalhousie University, Canada).

Joseph Brodsky was a lucky man: among the glut of talents given him was the gift of visual art as well. The Nobel Laureate never had lessons in drawing, but his sketches are distinguished by the sparseness of the malleable line, their sharp composition, and the ability to convey a mood. Professor Yuri Leving presents on his research, based on over a 300 unpublished drawings by Brodsky from different periods and varying styles and techniques.

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03/29/2017 - 4:15pm
 
 
 
 
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