Events Calendar

April 2018

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Women in Revolution - "Revolution Every Day: Early Soviet Posters and the Propagandizing of Women"
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04/05/2018 - 6:00pm
 
BOOK LAUNCH. THE CULTURAL LIFE OF CAPITALISM IN YUGOSLAVIA: (POST)SOCIALISM AND ITS OTHER

BOOK LAUNCH. THE CULTURAL LIFE OF CAPITALISM IN YUGOSLAVIA: (POST)SOCIALISM AND ITS OTHER

Thursday, April 5, 2018 - 6:00pm
Location: 
Marshall D. Shulman Seminar Room (1219 International Affairs Building, 420 W 118th St)
Thursday, April 5, 2018
6:00pm
Marshall D. Shulman Seminar Room (1219 International Affairs Building, 420 W 118th St)

Please join us for a book launch and discussion of Cultural Life of Capitalism in Yugoslavia: (Post)Socialism and Its Other (Palgrave, 2017), edited by Dijana Jelača, Maša Kolanović and Danijela Lugarić. The book offers a thought-provoking rethinking of the standard binary division between socialist and capitalist systems through the case study of the former Yugoslavia. Two of the book’s editors, Dijana Jelača(Brooklyn College) and Maša Kolanović(University of Zagreb), will introduce the book and contextualize it theoretical, historical, and sociopolitical frameworks, as well as highlight some of the volume’s most illuminating insights. The volume’s contributors Ana Hofman(Slovenian Academy of Science and Arts in Ljubljana) and Mitja Velikonja (University of Ljubljana) will discuss their individual chapter contributions within the larger context of the volume. The discussion will be moderated by Aleksandar Bošković (Columbia University).

Ana Hofman is a senior research fellow at the Institute of Culture and Memory Studies of the Slovenian Academy of Science and Arts in Ljubljana. Her research interests lie in the intersection between memory and music and sound studies, with a focus on activism and the social meaning of resistance in the past and present.  She has published many articles and book chapters, including two monographs: Staging socialist femininity: Gender Politics and Folklore Performances in Serbia (2011) and Music, Politics, Affect: New Lives of Partisan Songs in Slovenia (2015) dealing with the sonic reatualizations of cultural memory on anti-fascism in post-Yugoslav context. She is currently a post-doctoral Fulbright Fellow at the Graduate Center of City University New York.

Dijana Jelača teaches in the Film Department at Brooklyn College. She holds a PhD in Communication and Film Studies from UMass Amherst. Her areas of inquiry include feminist film studies, trauma and memory studies, and South Slavic film cultures. She is the author of Dislocated Screen Memory: Narrating Trauma in Post-Yugoslav Cinema (Palgrave 2016), and co-editor of The Routledge Companion to Cinema and Gender (Routledge, 2017), The Cultural Life of Capitalism in Yugoslavia (Palgrave, 2017) and The Future of (Post)Socialism(forthcoming). Her work has appeared in Camera ObscuraFeminist Media StudiesJump Cut, Signs and elsewhere. Jelača is currently completing a textbook manuscript Film Feminisms(forthcoming, Routledge). She is also a Programming Co-Director of the Bosnian-Herzegovinian Film Festival in New York City.

Maša Kolanović is Associate Professor of Contemporary Croatian Literature at the University of Zagreb, Croatia. She is the author of Underground Barbie (2008, 2012 in Croatian and German); Udarnik! Buntovnik? Potrošač…Popularna kultura i hrvatski roman od socijalizma do tranzicije (Worker! Rebel? Consumer… Popular Culture and Croatian Novel from Socialism to Transition, 2011, in Croatian), Jamerika: trip (2013, in Croatian), and the edited volume Komparativni postsocijalizam: slavenska iskustva (Comparative Postsocialism: Slavic Experiences, 2013, in Croatian) and Cultural Life of Capitalism in Yugoslavia: (Post)Socialim and its Other (co-edited with D. Jelača and D. Lugarić). Her field of interest is Croatian literature and popular culture in the Cold War and post-Cold War period, with a focus on Yugoslav socialism and the image of America in Eastern European cultures. Her participation in the event is sponsored by the project ''Economic Foundations of Croatian Literature'' at the Croatian Science Foundation.

Mitja Velikonja is a Professor for Cultural Studies and head of Center for Cultural and Religious Studies at University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. Main areas of his research include Central-European and Balkan political ideologies, subcultures and graffiti culture, collective memory and post-socialist nostalgia. His last monographs in English language are Rock'n'Retro - New Yugoslavism in Contemporary Slovenian Music (Sophia; 2013), Titostalgia – A Study of Nostalgia for Josip Broz (Peace Institute; 2008), Eurosis – A Critique of the New Eurocentrism(Peace Institute; 2005) and Religious Separation and Political Intolerance in Bosnia-Herzegovina (TAMU Press; 2003). He is a co-editor of Post-Yugoslavia - New Cultural and Political Perspectives (Palgrave; 2014), and co-editor of Yugoslavia from A Historical Perspective (HCHR; 2017). He is currently a visiting researcher at the Remarque Institute of the New York University. 

 

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04/05/2018 - 6:00pm
 
 
 
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The Living Fire, 2014

The Living Fire, 2014

Wednesday, April 11, 2018 - 7:00pm
Location: 
Deutsches Haus, 420 West 116th St. (off Amsterdam Ave.)

Ukrainian Film Club @ Columbia University

will screen the feature documentary by Ostap Kostiuk

The Living Fire, 2014

This stunningly beautiful and poetic movie chronicles three generations of Ukrainian Carpathian shepherds who struggle to keep their ancient trade alive in the face of modernity. It is a story about pitiless daily labor that knows no weekends, about a harmonious world that we’ve

 

lost in our search for comfort, about the childhood that is left behind when one takes on the role of an adult … The Living Fire has been a critical and viewers’ success at many film festivals around the world.

 

 

When: Wednesday, April 11, 2018, 7:00 PM

Where: Deutsches Haus, 420 West 116th St. (off Amsterdam Ave.)

Ukrainian with English subtitles

 

Yuri Shevchuk will introduce the film and mediate the discussion

Free and open to the public

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04/11/2018 - 7:00pm
 
Rosalind Morris - Gold, Gambling, & De-Industrialization in South Africa

Rosalind Morris - Gold, Gambling, & De-Industrialization in South Africa

Thursday, April 12, 2018 - 4:00pm
Location: 
709 Hamilton Hall

The talk, based on her nearly two decades of fieldwork in South Africa, is about itinerant migrants who make their living by risking their lives.  These men and women enter ruined gold mines to scavenge for remnants of gold.  Called Zama Zamas (after the isiZulu term for persistence, and also the word for gambling), these barehanded 'miners' risk everything for imali (money/value/gold).

Professor Morris explores the structures of value and forms of life being generated in these spaces, these zones of exception and extreme precarity, where sacrificial violence substitutes for abstract justice, and where the fetish character of money has reached its limit.  Treating the mines as a form of passage in Walter Benjamin's sense, the talk provides both an account of the afterlife of industrial mining and a meditation on the future history of de-industrialization--in South Africa, and possibly elsewhere.

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04/12/2018 - 4:00pm
 
The Culture of Post-Socialism: Black Sea Horizons

The Culture of Post-Socialism: Black Sea Horizons

Friday, April 13, 2018 - 9:15am
Location: 
328 Milbank Hall (Barnard)
The morning session, featuring a keynote “Images of Exclusion: Ethno-Nationalist Graffiti in The Balkans” by Mitja Velikonja (U of Ljubljana) and a roundtable discussion of Black Sea cinema after Socialism with Marta Figlerowicz, Marjeta Bozovic, Masha Shpolberg (all from Yale), will take place at 328 Milbank Hall  (Barnard) 9:15AM - 12:45 PM
 
The afternoon session (1219 IAB @ 2:30-7PM) will present the panel "Cultural Institutions in Post-Socialist Ukraine" with Dirk Uffelmann (U of Passau), Mayhill Fowler (Stetson University) and Bradley Gorski (Barnard) and my conversation with Bulgarian writer Georgi Gospodinov, who is currently a Fellow at the Center for Scholars and Writers, NYPL. 
 
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04/13/2018 - 9:15am
 
SYMPOSIUM: NEW DIRECTIONS IN PROKOFIEV STUDIES

SYMPOSIUM: NEW DIRECTIONS IN PROKOFIEV STUDIES

Friday, April 13, 2018 - 1:00pm
Location: 
Butler Library, Columbia University
 
 
Friday, April 13, 2018
1:00pm - 5:00pm
Butler Library, Columbia University

Please join the Harriman Institute, the Rare Book & Manuscript Library, and the Music Department at Columbia University for a symposium bringing together leading international scholars to discuss emerging trends in Prokofiev scholarship. Special focus will be on research conducted at Columbia’s Serge Prokofiev Archive. The symposium is free and open to the public.

Also in association with Columbia University’s year-long celebration of the 100th anniversary of Sergei Prokofiev’s American debut in New York City, there will be an event entitled Discovering Prokoviev: Music and the Archive on April 24, 2018, 7:00PM at the Maison Française. Click here for more information.

Presentations will include:

Rita McAllister (Royal Conservatoire of Scotland): “Things in Themselves: The ‘Seeds of the Flowers’, and the 138 Questions You Wished You Could Have Asked Prokofiev”

Christina Guillaumier (Royal College of Music, London): “Prokofiev’s Operas: Problems and Perspectives”

Natalia Savkina (Moscow State Tchaikovsky Conservatory): “A New Volume on Documents from the Serge Prokofiev Archive” 

Klara Moricz (Amherst College): “Soviet “méchanique” or the Bolshevik Sublime in Prokofiev’s Pas d’acier

Barbara Nissman (Professional Pianist): “The Two Fifths- Prokofiev’s Fifth Piano Sonata & Fifth Piano Concerto: A Performer’s View” 

 

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04/13/2018 - 1:00pm
 
 
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Music and the Archive

Music and the Archive

Tuesday, April 24, 2018 - 7:00pm
Location: 
Maison Française, Columbia University

Music and the Archive

“Discovering Prokofiev: Music and the Archive” is a unique program that brings together live music and documentary archives. Cynthia Liu, CC ’18, performs three solo piano works that highlight Prokofiev’s virtuosity as a composer and foreground the notions of interruption and irony, themes that recur brilliantly and tragically in Prokofiev’s art and life. Archivist Natalia Ermolaev (GSAS ‘10), an alumnus of  Columbia’s Department of Slavic Languages, complements the music with insights from the archive, illustrating the importance of documentary traces in mapping the complex, transnational impact of Prokofiev’s music for the last century.

Program

Three works by Sergei Prokofiev (1891 – 1953)

Sonata No. 2 in d minor, Op. 14
I. Allegro ma non troppo – Più mosso – Tempo primo
II. Scherzo – Allegro marcato
III. Andante
IV. Vivace – Moderato – Vivace

Toccata in C Major, Op. 11

Sonata No. 6 in A Major, Op. 82
I. Allegro moderato
II. Allegretto
III. Tempo di valzer lentissimo
IV. Vivace


Cynthia (Cindy) Liu (CC ‘18) is a senior pursuing a B.A. in English and Sociology. Since beginning piano studies at age six, first with her teacher emeritus, Elena Arsenyev, and now her mentor, Dr. Magdalena Stern-Baczewska, Cindy has enjoyed performances in New York’s Carnegie and Steinway Halls; Washington, D.C.’s Kennedy Center Concert Hall and Hungarian & Austrian embassies; her parents’ hometowns in China, Beijing and Neixiang; Toronto; and Paris. Cindy is writing her Sociology thesis, entitled, “Why Have There Been No Great Female Musicians?: Occupational Barriers to Women in the Classical Music Industry,” and has carried out research on Sergei Prokofiev’s formative time in Paris, presented in a paper entitled “Prolific, Passionate, Pivotal: Prokofiev in Paris.”

Natalia Ermolaev (GSAS ‘10) is the archivist for the Serge Prokofiev Archive at Columbia University. She has a PhD in Russian Literature from Columbia (2010) and a Master’s in Library Science from Rutgers University (2013). Natalia specializes in the Russian émigré community in interwar Paris, and was a Reid Hall Fellow in summer 2006. Working at the intersection of archival studies, information science, and literary history, Natalia is the Assistant Director of the Center for Digital Humanities at Princeton University.


 

This event is sponsored by: Columbia Global Centers | Paris; Department of Music, Columbia University; the Harriman Institute at Columbia University; Columbia University Club of France; Columbia Undergraduate Programs in Paris;  Fritz Reiner Center for Contemporary Music; Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Columbia University

 

 

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04/24/2018 - 7:00pm
 
 
 
Two-Day International Conference CRIMEA MATTERS at Columbia April 27-28

Two-Day International Conference CRIMEA MATTERS at Columbia April 27-28

Friday, April 27, 2018 - 9:30am
Location: 
Deutsches Haus, 420 116th St. (off Amsterdam Ave.)
The Slavic Department at Columbia University houses the international initiative "Black Sea Networks" (http://blackseanetworks.org/), the winner of the President’s Global Innovation Fund grant for 2016-2018. One of the initiative’s major research streams is " Crimea: Meta/History of a Place." This long-term international research program mobilizes an interdisciplinary team of scholars from the U.S., U.K., Canada, Ukraine, Belgium, and Turkey. Itsmain objective is to combat what Rory Finnin (Cambridge University) terms “Crimnesia,” the tendency to ignore Crimea or relegate it to a marginal role in the history of many different countries and regions. We submit existing discourses about Crimea to discussion and explore methodological questions raised by the study of Crimea, many of which also apply to Black Sea studies. How do we work on a site in which traditional dichotomies of empire and nation-state do not apply? How do we choose our historical timeframe and geographical boundaries? The peninsula offers a rich set of competing historical narratives; a metahistorical approach can help us parse these narratives, isolate invented or politically manipulated elements, and interrogate preconceptions based on our own areas of scholarly focus. 
 
The project kicked off last April with a symposium in Cambridge, U.K., “Crimea: Center of Gravity in the Black Sea.” Our upcoming conference at Columbia "Crimea Matters," builds on the success of the Cambridge forum, while expanding its disciplinary and thematic scope to advance our project to a new stage. The conference will bring together a wide range of specialists in Crimea—from history, archeology, musicology, literary and media studies to geography and environmental studies, international affairs, and conflict resolution. This will be the biggest international forum to date dedicated exclusively to Crimea, its history, ecology, culture and its key role in old and new ideological discourses. 
 
The conference, co-sponsored by the Harriman Institute, will take place on April 27-28, 2018 at the Deutsches Haus, 420 West 116th Street. We will open with a keynote address by Charles King (Georgetown) titled “Races, Spaces. Places” (April 27 at 9:30 AM). The program includes also the inaugural Memorial Shevelov Lecture in Ukrainian Studies (April 27, 6PM) and screening and discussion of the film Khaitarma (2013, dir. Akhtem Seitablaev)http://www.columbia.edu/cu/ufc/films/library_khaitarma.html (April 28, 7PM).
 
Complete program is available online at (http://blackseanetworks.org/events.html).
 
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04/27/2018 - 9:30am
 
 
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