2020 - 2021 Course Schedule

2020 – 2021 Year at a Glance
 

Slavic Languages

Course Offerings 2020-2021

 

Course descriptions, as well as specific sections and meeting times, can be found in the online Directory of Courses, http://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/#/cu/bulletin/uwb/sel/SLAL_Fall2020.html

Please be advised that the Slavic following courses are offered through Barnard:


Russian UN3595 SENIOR SEMINAR R 4:10pm-6:00pm Instructor: Emma K Lieber


Russian GU4344 ADV RUSSIAN THROUGH HISTORY MW 1:10pm-2:25pm Instructor: Julia Trubikhina


Language Courses

Fall 2020

“Fall” term courses will run the full 14-week term: Tues., Sept. 8, 2020 – Wed., Dec. 23, 2020.

 

Term

Subject Code

Course Number

Course Title

Instructor

Fall

RUSS

1101

First Year Russian I

Four sections.

Coordinator: Nataliya Kun

Fall

BCRS

1101

Elementary Bosnian Croatian Serbian I

Aleksandar Boskovic

Fall

CZCH

1101

Elementary Czech I

Christopher Harwood

Fall

POLI

1101

Elementary Polish I

Christopher Caes

Fall

UKRN

1101

Elementary Ukrainian I

Yuri Shevchuk

Fall

RUSS

2101

Second Year Russian I

Three sections.

Coordinator:

Alla Smyslova

Fall

BCRS

2101

Intermediate Bosnian Croatian Serbian I

Aleksandar Boskovic

Fall

CZCH

2101

Intermediate Czech I

Christopher Harwood

Fall

POLI

2101

Intermediate Polish I

Christopher Caes

Fall

UKRN

2101

Intermediate Ukrainian I

Yuri Shevchuk

Fall

RUSS

3101

Third Year Russian I

Alla Smyslova

Fall

RUSS

3105

Real World Russian I

Nataliya Kun

Fall

RUSS

3430

Russian for Heritage Speakers I

Alla Smyslova

Fall

UKRN

4006

Advanced Ukrainian Through Literature, Media and Politics I

Yuri Shevchuk

Fall

POLI

4101

Advanced Polish I

Christopher Caes

Fall

BCRS

4331

Advanced Bosnian Croatian Serbian I

Aleksandar Boskovic

Fall

RUSS

4342

Fourth Year Russian I

Tatiana Mikhailova

Fall

RUSS

4344

Advanced Russian Through History I

Julia Trubikhina

 

 

Content Courses Taught in Russian Fall 2020

 

Fall

RUSS

3332

Vvedenie v russkuiu literaturu: Scary Stories

Irina Reyfman

Fall

RUSS

3105

Real World Russian I

Nataliya Kun

Fall

RUSS

4344

Advanced Russian Through History I

Julia Trubikhina

 

Spring 2021

 

Term

Subject Code

Course Number

Course Title

Instructor

Spring

RUSS

1102

First Year Russian II

Four sections.

Coordinator: Nataliya Kun

Spring

BCRS

1102

Elementary Bosnian Croatian Serbian II

Aleksandar Boskovic

Spring

CZCH

1102

Elementary Czech II

Christopher Harwood

Spring

POLI

1102

Elementary Polish II

Claudia Kelley

Spring

UKRN

1102

Elementary Ukrainian II

Yuri Shevchuk

Spring

RUSS

2102

Second Year Russian II

Two sections.

Coordinator:

Tatiana Mikhailova

Spring

BCRS

2102

Intermediate Bosnian Croatian Serbian II

Aleksandar Boskovic

Spring

CZCH

2102

Intermediate Czech II

Christopher Harwood

Spring

POLI

2102

Intermediate Polish II

Christopher Caes

Spring

UKRN

2101

Intermediate Ukrainian II

Yuri Shevchuk

Spring

RUSS

3102

Third Year Russian II

Nataliya Kun

Spring

UKRN

4007

Advanced Ukrainian Through Literature Media and Politics II

Yuri Shevchuk

Spring

POLI

4102

Advanced Polish II

Christopher Caes

Spring

BCRS

4332

Advanced Bosnian Croatian Serbian II

Aleksandar Boskovic

Spring

RUSS

4343

Fourth Year Russian II

Tatiana Mikhailova

Spring

RUSS

4345

Advanced Russian Through History II

Julia Trubikhina

 

Content Courses Taught in Russian Spring 2021

 

Spring

RUSS

4338

Chteniia po russkoi literature: Voina i mir

Irina Reyfman

Spring

RUSS

4345

Advanced Russian Through History II

Julia Trubikhina

 

 

 

 

Undergraduate Literature & Culture Courses

Fall 2020

 

Fall

SLCL

3001

Slavic Cultures

Alan Timberlake

Fall

SLCL

3100

Folklore Past and Present: From Slavic Vampires to Urban Legends

Jessica Merrill

Fall

RUSS

3220

Literature & Empire

Emma Lieber

Fall

CLRS

4011

Dostoevsky, Tolstoy and the English Novel

Liza Knapp

Fall

CLCZ

4030

Post-War Czech Literature

Christopher Harwood

Fall

CLSL

4075

Soviet and Post-Soviet, Colonial, Post-Colonial Film

Yuri Shevchuk

Fall

RUSS

4107

Russian Literature and Culture in the New Millennium

Mark Lipovetsky

Fall

CLRS

4213

Cold War Reason: Cybernetics and the Systems Sciences

Adam Leeds

 

Spring 2021

 

“Spring” term courses will run the full 14-week term: Mon., Jan. 11, 2021 – Mon., Apr. 26, 2021.

Course descriptions, as well as specific sections and meeting times, will be available in advance of the early registration period in November 2020.

 

Spring

RUSS

3222

Tolstoy and Dostoevsky

Liza Knapp

Spring

RUSS

4046

The Trickster in the Modern Russian Literature & Culture

Mark Lipovetsky

Spring

RUSS

4155

History of Russian and Soviet Film

Daria Ezerova

 

Summer 2021

 

“Summer A” courses will run during the first half of the term: Mon., May 3, 2021 – Fri., June 18, 2021.

“Summer B” courses will run during the second half of the term: Mon., June 28, 2021 – Mon., Aug. 16, 2021.

Course descriptions, as well as specific sections and meeting times, will be available in advance of Summer registration in April 2021.
 

 

Summer A

RUSS

3221

Literature & Revolution

Jessica Merrill

Summer A

UKRN

4033

Beauty, Duty & Decadence

Mark Andryczyk

Summer A

CLRS

4037

Poets Rebels and Exiles: A Hundred Years of Russians and Russian Jews in America

Anna Katsnelson

Summer A

GEOR

4042

Cultural Heritage: A Georgian Case Study

Lauren Ninoshvili

Summer B

RUSS

4910

Literary Translation

Ron Meyer

 

 

Graduate Courses 2020-21

 

Fall

RUSS

6014

Old Russian Literature

Valentina Izmirlieva

Fall

RUSS

6223

Art of the Russian Poem

Mark Lipovetsky

Fall

RUSS

6330

Russian Romanticism

Boris Gasparov

Fall

SLLT

8001

Proseminar

Jessica Merrill

Fall

SLLT

9001

Doctoral Research Seminar

Mark Lipovetsky

 

Spring

RUSS

6040

Eighteenth Century Russian Literature

Irina Reyfman

Spring

RUSS

6501

Acmeism

Valentina Izmirlieva

Spring

SLLT

9001

Doctoral Research Seminar

Mark Lipovetsky

 

 

 

Course Descriptions 2020-21

 

Fall 2020


RUSS UN1101: First Year Russian I
(Four Sections)
Grammar, reading, composition, and conversation. Not for heritage speakers of Russian.

RUSS UN2101: Second Year Russian I
(Three sections)
Drill practice in small groups. Reading, composition, and grammar review.

Prerequisite: UN1102 or placement test

RUSS UN3101: Third-Year Russian I
Alla Smyslova
Recommended for students who wish to improve their active command of Russian. Emphasis on conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of selected texts and videotapes. Lectures. Papers and oral reports required. Conducted entirely in Russian.

Prerequisite: UN2102 or placement test

UN3105: Real World Russian
Nataliya Kun
This course is designed for continuing students of Russian to help them further develop their communicative competence in a broad range of social, cultural, and behavioral contexts. Emphasis is placed on pragmatic skills, conversational strategies, expanding vocabulary and idiomatic language, and better understanding stylistic registers and cultural contexts beyond linguistic competence.

RUSS UN3430: Russian for Heritage Speakers I  
A. Smyslova.
This course is designed for heritage speakers who have not yet learned to read or write and have limited reading and writing skills in Russian. The course is based on utilizing heritage speakers strength—well-developed aural skills—to develop their much weaker—literacy-- skills in a fast and effective way.

RUSS GU4342: Fourth Year Russian I
Tatiana Mikhailova

Systematic review and study of advanced Russian grammar and syntax; practicing analytical and creative writing, translation, and conversation; engagement with wide variety of media sources and development of cultural competence about contemporary Russian society. Conducted entirely in Russian. Prerequisites: UN 3102 or placement test.

RUSSGU4344 Advanced Russian Through History I (In Russian)
J. Trubikhina
A language course designed to meet the needs of those non-heritage and heritage learners who want to further develop their reading, speaking, and writing skills and be introduced to the history of Russia. The course is devoted to Russia’s thousand-year history, from the legendary times of Rurik to the beginning of the nineteenth century. The course’s task is to improve your spoken and written Russian through an engaging journey into the past with an eye to the formation of Russia’s statehood, as well to the works of art that interpreted this process and contributed to our understanding of Russian history. Taught in Russian. Prerequisite: UN3102 or placement test.

BCRS UN1101: Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I
Aleksandar Boskovic.
Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

BCRS UN1201: Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I
Aleksandar Boskovic.
Prerequisites: BCRS UN1102 or the equivalent. Readings in Serbian/Croatian/Bosnian literature in the original, with emphasis depending upon the needs of individual students.


BCRS GU4331: Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I
Aleksandar Boskovic.
Prerequisites: BCRS GU1202. Further develops skills in speaking, reading, and writing, using essays, short stories, films, and fragments of larger works. Reinforces basic grammar and introduces more complete structures.

CZCH UN1101: Elementary Czech I
Christopher Harwood.
Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepare students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

CZCH UN2101: Intermediate Czech I
Christopher Harwood.
Prerequisites: CZCH UN1102 or the equivalent.
Rapid review of grammar. Readings in


CLCZ GU4333: Readings in Czech Literature I
Christopher Harwood.
Prerequisites: Two years of college Czech or the equivalent. A close study in the original of representative works of Czech literature. Discussion and writing assignments in Czech aimed at developing advanced language proficiency.

POLI UN1101: Elementary Polish I
Claudia Kelley.
Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate

POLI UN2101: Intermediate Polish I
Christopher Caes.

Prerequisites: POLI UN1102 or the equivalent.  Rapid review of grammar; readings in contemporary nonfiction or fiction, depending on the interests of individual students.

POLI GU4101: Advanced Polish I
Christopher Caes.
Prerequisites: Two years of college Polish or the instructor's permission. Extensive readings from 19th- and 20th-century texts in the original. Both fiction and nonfiction, with emphasis depending on the interests and needs of individual students.

UKRN UN1101: Elementary Ukrainian I
Yuri Shevchuk.
Designed for students with little or no knowledge of Ukrainian. Basic grammar structures are introduced and reinforced, with equal emphasis on developing oral and written communication skills. Specific attention to acquisition of high-frequency vocabulary and its optimal use in real-life settings.

UKRN UN2101: Intermediate Ukrainian I
Yuri Shevchuk.
Prerequisites: UKRN UN1102 or the equivalent. Reviews and reinforces the fundamentals of grammar and a core vocabulary from daily life. Principal emphasis is placed on further development of communicative skills (oral and written). Verbal aspect and verbs of motion receive special attention.

UKRN GU4006: Advanced Ukrainian Through Literature, Media, and Politics I
Yuri Shevchuk.
The content-based modular course purports to develop student' capacity to use the Ukrainian language as a research and communication tool in a variety of specialized functional and stylistic areas that include literary fiction, scholarly prose, and printed and broadcast journalism. It is designed for students with interest in the history, politics, literature, culture and other aspects of contemporary Ukraine, as well as those who plan to do their research, business or reporting about Ukraine. The course is taught in Ukrainian. Being the equivalent to an advanced language course, the course will further develop students' proficiency in grammar to enable them to narrate and describe in major time frames the adequate command of aspect.

SLCL UN3001. Slavic Cultures
A. Timberlake.

The history of Slavic peoples - Russians, Czechs, Poles, Serbs, Croats, Ukrainians, Bulgarians - is rife with transformations, some voluntary, some imposed. Against the background of a schematic external history, this course examines how Slavic peoples have responded to and have represented these transformations in various modes: historical writing, hagiography, polemics, drama, and fiction, folk poetry, music, visual art, and film. Activity ranges over lecture (for historical background) and discussion (of primary courses).

SLCL UN3100: Folklore Past and Present: From Slavic Vampires to Urban Legends

J. Merrill
Folklore is everyday verbal culture characterized by multiplicity and variation. Think of the jokes, scary stories, or children’s rhymes known in your own communities. Right now, the historic events of 2020 are being processed in folklore: e.g. pandemic rumors, chants from racial justice protests, a story about illness that happened to “a friend of a friend.” This course has two focal points: 1) the history of folklore, explored through Slavic folklore genres, and 2) the collection of contemporary folklore. We will read fairytales, epic songs, legends about vampires and nature spirits, and learn about how these forms have been defined, collected, “faked,” and used as artistic inspiration and political ammunition. Students will also develop their own collection project, learn how to conduct interviews, and document and interpret the folklore they collect. 

RUSS UN3220: Literature & Empire
Emma Lieber
Explores the aesthetic and formal developments in Russian prose -- especially the rise of the monumental nineteenth-century novel -- as one manifestation of a complex array of national and cultural aspirations, humanistic and imperialist ones alike. Works by Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and Chekhov. Knowledge of Russian.

RUSS UN3332: Vvedenie v russkuiu literaturu: Scary Stories (In Russian)
I. Reyfman
.
Two years of college Russian or the instructor's permission. For non-native speakers of Russian. The course is devoted to the reading, analysis, and discussion of a number of Russian prose fiction works from the eighteenth to twentieth century. Its purpose is to give students an opportunity to apply their language skills to literature. It will teach students to read Russian literary texts as well as to talk and write about them. Its goal is, thus, twofold: to improve the students' linguistic skills and to introduce them to Russian literature and literary history. A close study in the original of the "scary stories" in Russian literature from the late eighteenth century. Conducted in Russian.


CLRS GU4011:  Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and the English Novel (In English)
L. Knapp.

Novels by Fyodor Dostoevsky and Leo Tolstoy will be read in conjunction with English ones. We read three novels of coming of age in Russia and England (Bronte’s Jane Eyre; Dostoevsky’s Netochka Nezvanova; Tolstoy’s Childhood, Boyhood, Youth), then turn to multiplot novels of love and death (Dostoevsky’s The Idiot; Eliot’s Middlemarch; Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina), and end with novels by Virginia Woolf, read “from the Russian point of view” (Mrs. DallowayTo the Lighthouse). At the outset, we will read two essays by Woolf and use them to frame our discussion.  In the first, “From the Russian Point of View,” Woolf contrasts the call for compassion and kinship she discovered in Russian novels to the constraint of novels of England where “space is limited,” where humanity is divided into “lower, middle, and upper classes,” where the soul is “alien,” and where “it is not the samovar but that teapot that rules.”  In “On Being Ill,” written in the aftermath of the influenza pandemic, Woolf asks why illness hasn’t “taken its place with love and battle and jealousy among the prime themes of literature?”  She considers how illness affects plot, poetics, and consciousness and “how the world change[s] shape” in the presence of illness.  We will use the questions she raises as we ask how, in the nineteenth-century works, illness (epilepsy, typhus, and especially consumption) affects the nature of fiction and understandings of justice and of the human condition. We will return to “On Being Ill” as we read Mrs. Dalloway. Knowledge of Russian is not required.

CLCZ GU4030: Postwar Czech Literature (in English)
C. Harwood.

A survey of postwar Czech fiction and drama. Knowledge of Czech not necessary. Parallel reading lists available in translation and in the original.

CLSL GU4075: Soviet and Post-Soviet, Colonial and Post-Colonial Film
Y. Shevchuk.

The course will discuss how filmmaking has been used as an instrument of power and imperial domination in the Soviet Union as well as on post-Soviet space since 1991. A body of selected films by Soviet and post-Soviet directors which exemplify the function of filmmaking as a tool of appropriation of the colonized, their cultural and political subordination by the Soviet center will be examined in terms of postcolonial theories. The course will focus both on Russian cinema and often overlooked work of Ukrainian, Georgian, Belarusian, Armenian, etc. national film schools and how they participated in the communist project of fostering a «new historic community of the Soviet people» as well as resisted it by generating, in hidden and, since 1991, overt and increasingly assertive ways their own counter-narratives. Close attention will be paid to the new Russian film as it re-invents itself within the post-Soviet imperial momentum projected on the former Soviet colonies.

RUSS GU4107: Russian Literature and Culture in the New Millennium
M. Lipovetsky.
 
Survey of Russian literature and culture from the late 1970s until today. Works by Petrushevskaya, Pelevin, Tolstaya, Sorokin, Ulitskaya, Akunin, Rubinshtein, Prigov, Vasilenko and others. Literature, visual art, and film, are examined in social and political

CLRS GU4213: Cold War Reason: Cybernetics and the Systems Sciences (pending approval)
Adam Leeds

The Cold War epoch saw broad transformations in science, technology, and politics. At their nexus a new knowledge was proclaimed, cybernetics, a putative universal science of communication and control. It has disappeared so completely that most have forgotten that it ever existed. Its failure seems complete and final. Yet in another sense, cybernetics was so powerful and successful that the concepts, habits, and institutions born with it have become intrinsic parts of our world and how we make sense of it. Key cybernetic concepts of information, system, and feedback are now fundamental to our basic ways of understanding the mind, brain and computer, of grasping the economy and ecology, and finally of imagining the nature of human life itself. This course will trace the echoes of the cybernetic explosion from the wake of World War II to the onset of Silicon Valley euphoria.

RUSS GR6014: Old Russian Literature
Valentina Izmirlieva

The course surveys major works of the early East Slavic literary canon. We will sample the variety of Slavic medieval genres by reading representative works of Kievan Rus’ and Muscovy, from the tenth through the seventeenth centuries. Students will be challenged to develop basic hermeneutic skills for reading medieval texts in their specific cultural and historical contexts. All works will be made available in the Old Russian original and modern Russian translation, and students are encouraged to read and discuss them in parallel. The course is required for all graduate students of Russian literature and ends with a comprehensive exam.
 

RUSS GR6223: Art of the Russian Poem
Mark Lipovetsky
The goal of this seminar is twofold: 1) To introduce students to the variety of styles, tropes and forms of Russian lyrical poetry in the 20th -21st cc.; 2) To develop and practice analytical skills. The material will include poems by both famous and lesser known poets, with an accent on the latter. For each class students will be required to familiarize themselves with readings either justifying an analytical approach or providing a sample for the analysis, and to be prepared to analyze 4-5 original texts. Each seminar will provide examples of a given subgenre of Russian lyrics, spreading from the early 20th c. to the present-day poetry (some units are spread for two or three classes, e.g. – 2 and 3, 10-12). Intentionally, texts for the analysis represent different trends and groups, spreading from Neo-Classical modernism to contemporary performative poetry. Having practiced the analysis of poetic texts during entire semester, for their final project, students will have to produce a comprehensive analysis of a lyrical poem (optionally, a poetic cycle) of their choosing placing it in the context of Russian poetic traditions.

RUSS GR6330: Russian Romanticism
Boris Gasparov

SLLT GR8001: Proseminar in Literary Studies
Jessica Merrill
Required of all candidates for the M.A. degree in Russian, Czech, Ukraine, and Polish literature. Introduction to the theory and practice of literary criticism.

SLLT GR9001: Doctoral Research Seminar
Mark Lipovetsky

The seminar provides strategic training in how to conduct scholarship in the field, how to conceptualize and plan a dissertation, how to write and defend a dissertation brief, and how to launch research on a dissertation, as well as in related aspects of the profession (including preparing fellowship and grant proposals, publications and conference papers based on dissertation work in progress). Required of students in their fourth year of the doctoral program.



Spring 2021


RUSS UN1102: First Year Russian II.
(Four sections)
Prerequisites: for 1102: RUSS UN1101 or the equivalent. Grammar, reading, composition, and conversation.

RUSS UN2102: Second-year Russian II.
(Two Sections)
Prerequisites: RUSS UN 2101 or placement test.  Drill practice in small groups. Reading, composition, and grammar review.

RUSS UN3102: Third-Year Russian II.
Nataliya Kun
Prerequisites: RUSS UN 3101 or placement test. Recommended for students who wish to improve their active command of Russian. Emphasis on conversation and composition. Reading and discussion of selected texts and videotapes. Lectures. Papers and oral reports required. Conducted entirely in Russian.

RUSS GU4343: Fourth-Year Russian II.
Tatiana Mikhailova

Systematic review and study of advanced Russian grammar and syntax; practicing analytical and creative writing, translation, and conversation; engagement with wide variety of media sources and development of cultural competence about contemporary Russian society. Conducted entirely in Russian.
Prerequisites: UN GU4342 or placement test.

RUSSGU4345 Advanced Russian Through History II (In Russian)
J. Trubikhina
A language course designed to meet the needs of those non-heritage and heritage learners who want to further develop their reading, speaking, and writing skills and be introduced to the history of Russia. The course is devoted to Russia’s history, from XIX to XXI century. The course’s task is to improve your spoken and written Russian through an engaging journey into the past with an eye to the formation of Russia’s statehood, as well to the works of art that interpreted this process and contributed to our understanding of Russian history. Taught in Russian. Prerequisite: UN3102 or placement test.

BCRS UN1102: Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II.
A. Boskovic
Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

BCRS UN2102: Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II.
A. Boskovic
Prerequisites: BCRS UN1102 or the equivalent. Readings in Serbian/Croatian/Bosnian literature in the original, with emphasis depending upon the needs of individual students.


BCRS GU4332: Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II.
A. Boskovic
Prerequisites: BCRS GU1202. Further develops skills in speaking, reading, and writing, using essays, short stories, films, and fragments of larger works. Reinforces basic grammar and introduces more complete structures.

CZCH UN1102: Elementary Czech II.
C. Harwood
Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepare students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

CZCH UN2102: Intermediate Czech II.
C. Harwood
Prerequisites: CZCH UN1102 or the equivalent.
Rapid review of grammar. Readings in contemporary fiction and nonfiction, depending upon the interests of individual students.


CLCZ GU4434: Readings in Czech Literature II.
C. Harwood
Prerequisites: Two years of college Czech or the equivalent. A close study in the original of representative works of Czech literature. Discussion and and writing assignments in Czech aimed at developing advanced language proficiency.

POLI UN1102: Elementary Polish II
Claudia Kelley
Essentials of the spoken and written language. Prepares students to read texts of moderate difficulty by the end of the first year.

POLI UN2102: Intermediate Polish II.
C. Caes
Prerequisites: POLI UN1102 or the equivalent.  Rapid review of grammar; readings in contemporary nonfiction or fiction, depending on the interests of individual students.

POLI GU4102y: Advanced Polish II.
C. Caes
Prerequisites: Two years of college Polish or the instructor's permission. Extensive readings from 19th- and 20th-century texts in the original. Both fiction and nonfiction, with emphasis depending on the interests and needs of individual students.

UKRN UN1102: Elementary Ukrainian II.
Y. Shevchuk.
Designed for students with little or no knowledge of Ukrainian. Basic grammar structures are introduced and reinforced, with equal emphasis on developing oral and written communication skills. Specific attention to acquisition of high-frequency vocabulary and its optimal use in real-life settings.

UKRN UN2102: Intermediate Ukrainian II.
Y. Shevchuk.
Prerequisites: UKRN UN1102 or the equivalent. Reviews and reinforces the fundamentals of grammar and a core vocabulary from daily life. Principal emphasis is placed on further development of communicative skills (oral and written). Verbal aspect and verbs of motion receive special attention.

UKRN GU4007: Advanced Ukrainian Through Literature, Media, and Politics II.
Y. Shevchuk.
The content-based modular course purports to develop student' capacity to use the Ukrainian language as a research and communication tool in a variety of specialized functional and stylistic areas that include literary fiction, scholarly prose, and printed and broadcast journalism. It is designed for students with interest in the history, politics, literature, culture and other aspects of contemporary Ukraine, as well as those who plan to do their research, business or reporting about Ukraine. The course is taught in Ukrainian. Being the equivalent to an advanced language course, the course will further develop students' proficiency in grammar to enable them to narrate and describe in major time frames the adequate command of aspect.

RUSS UN3222: Tolstoy & Dostoevsky.
L. Knapp.
Two epic novels, Tolstoy's War and Peace and Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov, will be read along with selected shorter works. Other works by Tolstoy include his early Sebastopol Tales, which changed the way war is represented in literature; Confession, which describes his spiritual crisis; the late novellas “Kreutzer Sonata" and "Hadji Murad"; and essays on capital punishment and a visit to a slaughterhouse. Other works by Dostoevsky include his fictionalized account of life in Siberian prison camp, Notes from the Dead HouseNotes from the Underground, his philosophical novella on free will, determinism, and love; "A Gentle Creature," a short story on the same themes; and selected essays from Diary of a Writer. The focus will be on close reading of the texts. Our aim will be to develop strategies for appreciating the structure and form, the powerful ideas, the engaging storylines, and the human interest in the writings of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky.  Knowledge of Russian is not required.

RUSS GU4046. The Trickster in the Modern Russian Lit & Culture.
M. Lipovetsky
“Trickster” does not simply mean “deceiver” or “rogue” (the definition of trickster according to the Oxford Encyclopedic English Dictionary), but rather “creative idiot”, to use Lewis Hyde’s expression. This hero unites the qualities of characters who at first sight have little in common — the “selfish buffoon” and the “culture hero”; someone whose subversions and transgressions paradoxically amplify the culture-constructing effects of his (and most often it is a “he”) tricks. The trickster is a typical comic protagonist – it is enough to recollect Renard the Fox from the medieval Roman de Renard, Panurge from François Rabelais’ The Life of Gargantua and of Pantagruel, Cervantes’ Sanchо Panza, Beaumarchais’s Figaro, Gogol’s Khlestakov, Mark Twain’s Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn, Yaroslav Hašek’s Švejk, Charlie Chaplin’s Tramp,   Max Bialystock in Mel Brooks’ Producers, Bart Simpson and Borat (Sacha Baron Cohen), as well as Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert along with many other comical characters of the same genre – to  confirm this self-evident thesis.

RUSS GU4155: History of Russian & Soviet Film.
Daria Ezerova
This course surveys developments in Russian film history and style from the prerevolutionary beginnings of cinema through the Soviet and post-Soviet experience. We will be studying both the aesthetic qualities of the films and their historical and cultural contexts. Students will be exposed to a wide range of visual media, including experimental films of the 1920s, films on Russia's experience of World War II, Soviet classics, late Soviet and contemporary Russian films. Readings will include theoretical articles and selections from Russian film history and criticism. All readings are in English and the films will be screened with English subtitles.

RUSS GU4338: Chteniia po russkoi literature: Voina i mir. 
Irina Reyfman

The course is devoted to reading and discussing of Tolstoy's masterpiece. Classes are conducted entirely in Russian.

RUSS GR6040: Eighteenth Century Russian Literature.
Irina Reyfman
 A survey of eighteenth-century Russian poetry, prose and drama in the original. The reading list includes Feofan Prokopovich, Vasily Trediakovsky, Mikhailo Lomonosov, Alexsandr Sumarokov, Alexsandr Radishchev, Gavrila Derzhavin, and Nikolai Karamzin.

RUSS GR6501: Acmeism.
Valentina Izmirlieva

A survey of Acmeist aesthetics and a study in the original of major works of the Russian Acmeists: Innokentii Annenskii, Nikolai Gumilev, Anna Akhmatova, Osip Mandelshtam, Mikhail Kuzmin, and Vladislav Khodasevich.


SLLT GR9001: Doctoral Research Seminar.
Mark Lipovetsky
The seminar provides strategic training in how to conduct scholarship in the field, how to conceptualize and plan a dissertation, how to write and defend a dissertation brief, and how to launch research on a dissertation, as well as in related aspects of the profession (including preparing fellowship and grant proposals, publications and conference papers based on dissertation work in progress). Required of students in their fourth year of the doctoral program.

 

NEW COURSES (PENDING APPROVAL)

Hegel (GU) – Adam Leeds

The Slavs: Myths, Literacies and Attitudes (UN) – Danko Sipka
This undergraduate course is intended for those interested in broadening their horizons about Slavic languages and cultures, whether they have a previous exposure to some of them or not. The course will explore the processes of establishing Slavic nations and their traditions of literacy focusing on the clashes of various ideological and political programs as well as on the commonly held beliefs and attitudes around them (including common myths). The observed phenomena will be discussed using the concepts and tools of cross-cultural linguistics and psychology, which will make the students familiar with several methodological frameworks in those fields. The intended effect of this entry-level course is to generate interest in the study of Slavic languages, cultures, and societies.

Hyphenated Minds: Heritage Speakers and their Vocabulary (GR) – Danko Sipka
This graduate-undergraduate humanities laboratory is designed to evoke interest in the mental lexicon of heritage speakers, a conspicuous gap in heritage language studies. While most examples that the lecturer will provide will be from the heritage speakers of Slavic languages, the course will be open to graduate students in all foreign languages. The class-contact part will first explore the key concepts in mental lexicon and bilingualism. Then, in the real-life lab part, the students would visit the areas in the City with a high concentration of heritage speakers (such as Brighton Beach for those concentrating on Russian or Astoria for those with interest in BCS). They would then conduct research and report on it in the class. Their research would be critiqued in class discussions and the students would be pointed to the directions of further research.

Agent of Change: Ukrainian Art Between Revolutions (GU) - Olena Martynyuk

Thinking Bodies: Literature Film & Performance (UN)
Milica Ilicic

This course surveys a variety of ways in which embodiment participates in attaining, producing, and transmitting human knowledge. Perspectives on embodiment represented in this course are drawn from feminist scholarship, affect studies, religion, psychoanalysis, and performance studies, and include a selection of texts that address the current conversations around illness, contagion, and race. Theoretical discussions are enriched by insights from a diverse selection of cultural production, ranging from the classics of American, German, and Russian literature, to the less well-known cinematic and performative traditions of former Yugoslavia, Poland, and Japan. Through close readings, seminar discussions, collaborative work, and written assignments, students analyze and synthesize different modes of thinking about, portraying, and experiencing their own body and the bodies of others. Ultimately, they are asked to reflect on the role of embodiment in their own personal, intellectual, and political identities.

 

Summer 2021 A

RUSS UN3221: Literature & Revolution.
Jessica Merrill
Course on Russian literature, film, and culture of the revolutionary period.  Topics of study include: poetic theory and practice, abstract art, film and montage theory, cultural politics, science fiction, the socialist realist novel, and the fantastic. The syllabus includes works by: Akhmatova, Bely, Blok, Bogdanov, Bulgakov, Eisenstein, Goncharova, Kataev, Khlebnikov, Kollontai, Kuleshov, Lenin, Mayakovsky, Nabokov, Rodchenko, Shklovsky, Siniavsky, Trotsky, Tsvetaeva, Zamiatin. Knowledge of Russian not required.

UKRN GU4033: Beauty Duty & Decadence
Mark Andryczyk
The course focuses on the rise of modernism in Ukrainian literature in the late 19th century and early 20th century, a period marked by a vigorous, often biting polemic between the populist Ukrainian literary establishment and young Ukrainian writers who were inspired by their European counterparts. Students will read prose, poetry, and drama written by Ivan Franko, the writers of the Moloda Musa, Olha Kobylianska, Lesia Ukrainka, and Volodymyr Vynnychenko among others. The course will trace the introduction of urban motifs and settings, as well as decadence, into Ukrainian literature and analyze the conflict that ensued among Ukrainian intellectuals as they forged the identity of the Ukrainian people. The course will be supplemented by audio and visual materials reflecting this period in Ukrainian culture. Entirely in English with a parallel reading list for those who read.

 

CLRS GU4037: Poets Rebels and Exiles: A Hundred Years of Russians and Russian Jews in America.
Anna Katsnelson
In recent decades, Russian immigrant identity has changed. Immigrants and children of immigrants are much more involved with their home country. Fiction by Russian-speaking writers shows and also establishes relationship to geographies of their birth, usually Soviet successor nations such as Russia. The focus of this class is an analysis of works by Russian-speaking writers, filmmakers, and artists who create and also trace deepening forms of dialogue between the former Soviet Republics and North America. This immigrant fiction deserves a redefinition that is more appropriate to twenty first century concerns of a multicultural, transnational reality in a world with porous borders.

GEOR GU4042: Cultural Heritage: A Georgian Case Study.

Lauren Ninoshvili
This seminar brings anthropological perspectives to bear on the practices and ideologies of cultural heritage in the Republic of Georgia today, when culture has proven a key political and economic pawn in a context of ongoing postsocialist struggle.



NEW COURSES (PENDING APPROVAL)

Czech Culture and Society After the Fall of Communism (GU) – Christopher Harwood

Polish Science Fiction and Fantasy (GU) – Christopher Caes

 

 

Summer 2021 B

RUSS GU4910: Literary Translation
Ron Meyer
Prerequisites: four years of college Russian or the equivalent. Workshop in literary translation from Russian into English focusing on the practical problems of the craft. Each student submits a translation of a literary text for group study and criticism. The aim is to produce translations of publishable quality.