Events Calendar

February 2019

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Women and Resistance in Russia Speaker Series - Lilya Kaganovsky

Women and Resistance in Russia Speaker Series - Lilya Kaganovsky

Wednesday, February 6, 2019 - 6:00pm
Location: 
Barnard, Ella Weed Room

 
Lilya Kaganovsky (U of Illinois)
 

Mono | Dia | Polyphony: Muratova, Sound and Image

“Not text, but texture”
V. Nabokov, Pale Fire

 

Kira Muratova’s 1992 film, Chuvstvitel’nyi militsioner (The Sentimental Policeman), opens with a close-up of a baby’s face. The baby (Natasha) is lying in a purple and green cabbage patch, occasionally illuminated by a passing searchlight. Nearby, a policeman (the “sentimental policeman” of the title) is playing with a broken doll. Suddenly, as we see the mouth of the baby become contorted in what we assume to be crying, the policeman jumps up and begins to perform a series of theatrical movements: he spins around, he covers his ears, he dances in circles, and we understand from this exaggerated gestural language that he can hear the baby crying, even if we can’t. Indeed, since the opening close-up of the baby’s face, we have been hearing sound, but that sound has been insistently extra-diegetic: the twelfth of the pieces in Tchaikovsky’s piano suite The Seasons, titled “Sviatki” (Noël/Christmas). Only at the point when the sentimental policeman actually finds the baby and both of them occupy the same frame, does the film switch from the extra-diegetic music to synchronized sound: finally, as he leans over the baby, we hear her cry.

Starting with her Soviet-era productions, this presentation will focus on the relationship between sound and image, body and voice in Muratova’s films, the layered textures of her cinematic language achieved through super-imposition, polyphony, and heteroglossia.

This event is supported by a grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York. The lecture series is convened by Professor Valentina Izmirlieva and co-sponsored by the Harriman Institute, the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality, the Office of the Dean of the Humanities, and the Columbia-Barnard Slavic Department.


Lilya Kaganovsky is Professor of Slavic, Comparative Literature, and Media & Cinema Studies, and the Director of the Program in Comparative & World Literature at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Her publications include The Voice of Technology: Soviet Cinema’s Transition to Sound, 1928-1935 (Indiana, 2018) and How the Soviet Man was Unmade (Pittsburgh, 2008); the edited volumes Arctic Cinemas and the Documentary Ethos (with Anna Stenport and Scott MacKenzie, 2019) and Sound, Speech, Music in Soviet and Post-Soviet Cinema (with Masha Salazkina, 2014), and articles on Soviet and post-Soviet cinema. She is a member of the editorial board of the journal Studies in Russian and Soviet Cinema and the I.B. Tauris series Kino, and regularly contributes film reviews to the on-line cinema journal KinoKultura


Wednesday, February 6, 6-8pm, Barnard, Ella Weed Room 

 

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02/06/2019 - 6:00pm
 
 
A CONVERSATION WITH AUTHOR VLADIMIR PIŠTALO

A CONVERSATION WITH AUTHOR VLADIMIR PIŠTALO

Friday, February 8, 2019 - 6:00pm
Location: 
Marshall D. Shulman Seminar Room, 1219 International Affairs Building (420 W 118th St)

Please join the Harriman Institute, in collaboration with the East Central European Center, the Njegos Endowment for Serbian Language and Culture, and LeitmotivArts, for a conversation with Vladimir Pištalo, author of Sunce Ovog Dana: Pismo Andriću (The Sun of This Day: a letter to Ivo Andrić).

Ivo Andrić (1892 – 1975) was a Yugoslav novelist, poet and short story writer who won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1961. Pištalo's conversation with Ivo Andrić is a conversation with the tradition. It shows us a different Andrić, more emotional, more playful, more passionate. It is also a dialogue between two moments in history: the decolonization that marked Andrić's era, and neocolonialism.

Vladimir Pištalowas born in Sarajevo in 1960. He studied law in Belgrade and Sarajevo and received a PhD in American history from the University of New Hampshire. Pištalo’s first story was published in a literary magazine when he was eighteen, and his first book was published when he was twenty-one. Since that time, he has published eleven books of fiction. Tesla: A Portrait with Masks, his first book to be translated into English, won the 2008 NIN Literary Award, the most prestigious award in Serbia, and has appeared in ten languages. He teaches U.S. and world history at Becker College in Massachusetts.

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02/08/2019 - 6:00pm
 
 
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BREAKING THROUGH THE STATE BORDER AS AN ART PROJECT

BREAKING THROUGH THE STATE BORDER AS AN ART PROJECT

Monday, February 11, 2019 - 12:00pm
Location: 
Marshall D. Shulman Seminar Room, 1219 International Affairs Building (420 W 118th St)

Please join the Ukrainian Studies Program at the Harriman Institute, Columbia University for a presentation by Nazar Kozak (National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine).

An example of border art, a politically motivated mode of art production, which is staged directly in site on state borders or has them in its primary focus, Maria Kulykivska's endurance The Raft Crimea (2016) emerged as the artist's personal reflection on migration politics and on the social tensions they produce. For Ukraine, this theme has a special connotation because of Russia's annexation of the Crimea peninsula and hybrid invasion in the country's east, which resulted in the displacement of more than a million people. The artist planned to undertake a 700-mile journey on a safety raft down the Dnipro river from Kyiv to the European Union's border and then to cross it illegally. Having in its focus this challenging and dangerous project, which did not run according to its initial plan, this presentation attempts to explore how art can contribute to the praxis of resistance against the world's biopolitical divide

Nazar Kozak is a senior research scholar in the Department of Art Studies at the Ethnology Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. Previously he taught art history at the Ivan Franko National University of Lviv. Kozak’s primary research is on Byzantine and post-Byzantine art in Eastern Europe. More recently, he has begun to work on contemporary activist art. His article on art interventions during the Ukrainian Maidan revolution was published in the Spring 2017 issue of the Art Journal; it received an honorable mention as a finalist for that year’s Art Journal Award.

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02/11/2019 - 12:00pm
 
 
Women and Resistance in Russia Speaker Series - Yevgenia Albats

Women and Resistance in Russia Speaker Series - Yevgenia Albats

Wednesday, February 13, 2019 - 6:30pm
Location: 
1219 International Affairs Building



Yevgenia Albats
 (New Times, Moscow), “Anna Politkovskaya: Prevailing Against All Odds”

Wednesday, February 13, 6:30-8:30pm, 1219 IAB, Harriman Institute 
 

Yevgenia M. Albats is a Russian investigative journalist, political scientist, author and radio host. Since 2007 she has been the Political Editor and then Editor-in-Chief and CEO of The New Times, a Moscow-based, Russian language independent political weekly. It went digital-only since June of 2017, when its distribution and sales got severed by the Russian authorities. Since 2004, Albats has hosted Absolute Albats, a talk-show on Echo Moskvy, the only remaining liberal radio station in Russia. Albats was an Alfred Friendly Press Fellow assigned to the Chicago Tribune in 1990, and a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University in 1993. She graduated from Moscow State University in 1980, and received her PhD in Political Science from Harvard University in 2004. She is a member of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) since its founding in 1996. Albats taught at Yale in 2003-2004. She was a full-time professor at Moscow’s Higher School of Economics, teaching institutional theory of the state and bureaucracy, until 2011 when her courses were cancelled at the request of top Kremlin officials. In 2017 Albats was chosen as inaugural fellow at Kelly’s Writers House and Perry House at the University of Pennsylvania. Albats is the author of the four independently researched books, including one on the history of the Russian political police, the KGB, whose graduates are running the country today. She has a daughter, and resides in Moscow, Russia.

This event is supported by a grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York. The lecture series is convened by Professor Valentina Izmirlieva and co-sponsored by the Harriman Institute, the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality, the Office of the Dean of the Humanities, and the Columbia-Barnard Slavic Department.


 

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02/13/2019 - 6:30pm
 
THE UKRAINIAN QUESTION IN THE RUSSIAN EMPIRE REVISITED

THE UKRAINIAN QUESTION IN THE RUSSIAN EMPIRE REVISITED

Thursday, February 14, 2019 - 12:00pm
Location: 
Marshall D. Shulman Seminar Room (1219 International Affairs Building)

Please join the Ukrainian Studies Program at the Harriman Institute, Columbia University for a presentation by Johannes Remy (Visiting Assistant Professor of History at Columbia University).

Johannes Remy will speak about his award-winning book Brothers or Enemies: The Ukrainian National Movement and Russia, from the 1840s to the 1870s (University of Toronto Press, 2016). He studies the Ukrainian question from both sides: the Ukrainian national activists and imperial politicians. The book is based on archival sources, many of them previously unknown to historians of the topic. The new findings include discussions about Ukrainian independence already in the 1860s, a temporary alliance between the Kyiv Hromada and the Governor-General of Kyiv Ilarion Vasilchikov, negotiations between the Hromada and the Polish underground national government, a Ukrainian proclamation forged by the gendarmes in order to deport the author of the Ukrainian anthem Pavlo Chubynsky, and much else. The book has won Canadian Association for Ukrainian Studies book award and Ivan Franko International Prize in Ukraine.  

Johannes Remy received his Ph.D. from University of Helsinki (2000). He taught at the same university until his immigration to Canada in 2009. He has taught at several Canadian universities, including York University in Toronto and Carleton University in Ottawa. In 2015-16 he was Postdoctoral Research Fellow at College of Europe Natolin (Warsaw), the European Union's institute of higher learning. He has published two monographs in English and a textbook in history of Ukraine in his native Finnish. He is Visiting Assistant Professor of History at Columbia University for the Spring 2019 semester.

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02/14/2019 - 12:00pm
 
 
 
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ENVISIONING UKRAINIAN LITERATURE 2019: VERSIONS AND DEMARCATIONS, PART I

ENVISIONING UKRAINIAN LITERATURE 2019: VERSIONS AND DEMARCATIONS, PART I

Tuesday, February 19, 2019 - 4:00pm
Location: 
1201 International Affairs Building (420 West 118th St, 12th floor)
Please join the Ukrainian Studies Program at the Harriman Institute, Columbia University for a round table discussion on Envisioning Ukrainian Literature 2019: Versions and Demarcations, Part I.
 
What are the different ways that Ukrainian literature can be defined in 2019? Literature written in the Ukrainian language? Literature written by citizens of Ukraine in any language? Literature written in Ukrainian outside of Ukraine? Literature written by Ukrainians living outside of Ukraine, in any language? Literature written about Ukraine in any language? This event gathers a panel of writers and scholars at a round table to discuss various ways of belonging to Ukrainian literature.
 
Speakers: Vasyl Makhno, Oleksiy Nikitin, Maria Rewakowicz
 
Discussant: Yuri Shevchuk
 
Moderator: Mark Andryczyk
 
PARTICIPANTS:
Vasyl Makhno, born in Chortkiv, Ukraine, is a Ukrainian poet, prose writer, essayist, and translator. He is the author of twelve collections of poetry: Схима / Skhyma (1993), Самотність Цезаря / Caesar’s Solitude (1994),  Книга пагорбів та годин / The Book of Hills and Hours (1996), Плавник риби / The Flipper of the Fish (2002), 38 віршів про Нью-Йорк і дещо інше / 38 Poems about New York and Some Other Things (2004), Cornelia Street Café: нові та вибрані вірші / Cornelia Street Café: New and Selected Poems (2007), Зимові листи / Winter Letters (2011),  я хочу бути джазом і рок-н-ролом / I Want to be Jazz and Rock’n’Roll (2013), Ровер / Bike (2015) Єрусалимські вірші / Jerusalem Poems (2016) and most recently  Паперовий міст / Paper Bridge (2017). He has also published a book of short stories Дім в Бейтінґ Голлов / House in Bating Hollow (2015) and two books of essays Парк кульутури і відпочинку імені Ґертруди Стайн / The Gertrude Stein Memorial Cultural and Recreation Park (2006) and Котилася торба / Horn of Plenty (2011). Makhno currently lives in New York City.
 
Oleksiy Nikitin, born in Kyiv, Ukraine, is a writer of prose and a member of the Ukrainian center of the International PEN-club. His books have been translated and published in Ukraine, Russia, United Kingdom, Italy, Switzerland and the United States. Nikitin is the author of several novels, a number of short prose pieces, and numerous short stories including: Рука птицелова/ The Bird Catcher’s Hand (2000) (awarded the Korolenko prize of the National Writers Union of Ukraine, for the best Ukrainian prose written in Russian), the novel Три жизни Сергея Бояршинова, банкира и художника / The Three Lives of Sergey Boyarshinov, a banker and artist (2003), the collection of short prose Окно на базар / A Window to the Market (2004), the novels Istemi (2011), Mahjong (2012), and Victory Park (2014). In 2014 Victory Park was awarded the Russian Prize, which is awarded to extraordinary prose works written in Russian by authors not living in Russia. The novel’s Ukrainian translation was published by Fabula in 2016. In 2016 the Ukrainian publishing house “Lyuta Sprava”, based in Kiev published his short novel entitled Санитар с Институтской / A Paramedic from Institutska St. In the same year Druzhba Narodov due to political reasons published it under a different title Shkil-Mozdil. The setting for most of Nikitin’s writings is Kyiv, Ukraine where he lives.
 
Maria G. Rewakowicz was born in Lidzbark Warmiński, Poland. She holds a PhD from the University of Toronto. Rewakowicz teaches Ukrainian literature at Rutgers University--New Brunswick and is also affiliated with the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of Washington. She is the author of the monographs Ukraine’s Quest for Identity: Embracing Cultural Hybridity in Literary Imagination, 1991-2011 (2018), Literature, Exile, Alterity: The New York Group of Ukrainian Poets (2014) and co-editor of Contemporary Ukraine on the Cultural Map of Europe (2009). She also authored a book of essays Persona non grata (2012) and compiled two anthologies of the New York Group poetry, all three published in Ukraine.  She is the author of four books of poetry: З мішка мандрівника / From a Wanderer's Sack (1987), Шепотіння, шепотіння / Whispering, Whispering (1989), М’яке Е  / Soft E (1992), and Зелений дах / The Green Roof (1999). Rewakowicz lives in New York City.
 
Yuri Shevchuk, born in Volodymyrets, Ukraine, is lecturer of Ukrainian language at Columbia University’s Department of Slavic Languages. He holds a Ph.D. in Germanic Philology from Kyiv State University (1987), and MA in Political Science from the New School for Social Research (1996). He has published in the US, Canadian, and Ukrainian press and on the Internet on issues of Ukrainian language, identity, culture, Ukrainian and world cinema.  His latest publication is Beginner's Ukrainian with Interactive Online Workbook a textbook for university students and independent learners worldwide, (Hippocrene Books, August 2013, second edition) and Мовна шизофренія: quo vadis, Україно? / Linguistic Schizophrenia. Whither, Ukraine? (2015). He has lectured on Ukrainian language, culture, and film at leading US, Canadian, Italian, Spanish, Polish, Ukrainian universities. He is currently working on Ukrainian-English Collocations Dictionary and on the project entitled «Ukrainian language and identity since 1991».
 
Mark Andryczyk, born in Philadelphia, USA, has a PhD in Ukrainian Literature from the University of Toronto (2005). His monograph The Intellectual as Hero in 1990s Ukrainian Fiction was published by the University of Toronto Press in 2012. A Ukrainian edition of that monograph, Intelektual iak heroi ukrains’koi prozy 90-kh rokiv XX stolittia was published by Piramida in 2014.  Since 2008, he has administrator the Ukrainian Studies Program at the Harriman Institute, Columbia University and has taught Ukrainian literature at its Department of Slavic Languages. He is a translator of Ukrainian literature into English. In 2008-2017 he organized the Contemporary Ukrainian Literature Series (cosponsored by the Harriman and Kennan Institutes), which brought leading Ukrainian literary figures to audiences in North America. Andryczyk is editor and compiler of The White Chalk of Days, the Contemporary Ukrainian Literature Series Anthology (Academic Studies Press, 2017). He has translated eleven essays by Yuri Andrukhovych for the publication My Final Territory: Selected Essays (University of Toronto Press, 2018).
 
 
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02/19/2019 - 4:00pm
 
Mikhail Kaufman

Mikhail Kaufman

Wednesday, February 20, 2019 - 7:00pm
Location: 
Deutsches Haus, Columbia University (420 West 116th Street (off Amsterdam Ave)

The Ukrainian Film Club at Columbia will hold a mini-retrospective of the Soviet filmmaker Mikhail Kaufman. Brother of David Kaufman, better known to the world as Dzyga Vertov, Mikhail Kaufman has remained a largely obscure figure of early Soviet cinema. One of the prominent participants of the Kino-Eye Group, innovator in his own right, he actively experimented with montage, using effects of still frame and hidden camera among others.

Thanks to the efforts of the National Oleksander Dovzhenko Center in Kyiv two silent films by Mikhail Kaufman In Spring, 1929 and An Unprecedented Campaign, 1931 have been restored and issued as a set of DVDs with exclusive new soundtracks and a book of commentaries and related documents of that era. The first part of the mini-retrospective will feature the documentary film In Spring, 1929

This outstanding example of the Ukrainian silent cinema avant-garde captures the spirit and poetry of Kyiv in late 1920s. Kaufman’s response to his brother’s (Dzyga Vertov) celebrated Man with a Movie Camera, this rarely seen document of the epoch was shot in the middle of Soviet Union’s transition from revolutionary enthusiasm to Stalinist totalitarianism. The French film historian George Sadoul wrote that In Spring “opened a completely new form of documentary cinema for us – a poem in which lyrical images of thaw and swollen flower buds reflect the pathos of Soviet advancement on the way of socialist construction, while not concealing the remnants of the past that still exist.” In Spring will be screened and discussed on Wednesday, February 20, 2019, 7:00 PM, at the Deutsches Haus, 420 West 116th St. (off Amsterdam Ave.). The film is English subtitles. Dr. Yuri Shevchuk will introduce the film and lead the discussion. This free and open to the public event is organized with the support of the Oleksander Dovzhenko National Film Center, Kyiv, Ukraine.

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02/20/2019 - 7:00pm
 
FILM SCREENING & DISCUSSION. LOVE HUNTER

FILM SCREENING & DISCUSSION. LOVE HUNTER

Thursday, February 21, 2019 - 6:15pm
Location: 
Harriman Institute Atrium, 12th Floor International Affairs Building (420 W 118th St)

FILM SCREENING & DISCUSSION. LOVE HUNTER

Thursday, February 21, 2019
6:15pm
Harriman Institute Atrium, 12th Floor International Affairs Building (420 W 118th St)

Please join the Njegoš Endowment for Serbian Language and Culture at Columbia University's East Central European Center and the Harriman Institute for a screening of the Serbian film Love Hunter (2014) followed by a discussion with director Branislav Bala.

Love Hunter tells the story of Milan Mumin, the lead singer of a the hugely influential Serbian rock band Love Hunters, who in the 1990s electrified and gave voice to a generation of Serbians fighting an oppressive regime. Ten years later, we find Milan in New York City, driving a taxi (long shifts and loopy fares) and cobbling together funds for a recording session of his dream album to be recorded and released in America. When his bass guitar player suddenly quits, he finds a talented but prickly replacement and a romantic spark in a free-spirited guitarist named Kim. As rehearsals start picking up steam, Milan's longtime Serbian girlfriend Lela arrives with very different plans for their future—she wants him to come home to Serbia where his reputation will let him be anything he wants—but Milan is determined to make his recording in America, at any cost. The film was a New York Times Critics’ Pick of the week, and the New York Times called it "at once fantastical and gritty… one of the most refreshing New York independent films."

Branislav Bala, a writer, director, and producer, is a Serbian filmmaker based in New York City. He holds a MFA in film directing from Columbia University.

 

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02/21/2019 - 6:15pm
 
 
 
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