Events Calendar

April 2019

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Turgenev Revisited: The Literary Reflection of the Essay Hamlet and Don Quixote in Anatoly Lunacharsky’s The Liberated Don Quixote and Isaac Babel’s Red Cavalry

Turgenev Revisited: The Literary Reflection of the Essay Hamlet and Don Quixote in Anatoly Lunacharsky’s The Liberated Don Quixote and Isaac Babel’s Red Cavalry

Monday, April 1, 2019 - 6:15pm
Location: 
1201 International Affairs Building (420 West 118th St, 12th floor)

Monday, April 1, 2019

The Literary Reflection of the Essay Hamlet and Don Quixote in Anatoly Lunacharsky’s The Liberated Don Quixote and Isaac Babel’s Red Cavalry by Bettina Kaibach

6:15pm

1201 International Affairs Building (420 W 118th St)
 

Please join us for a talk by Bettina Kaibach, Special Lecturer at the University of Heidelberg (Germany), titled “The Literary Reflection of the Essay Hamlet and Don Quixote in Anatoly Lunacharsky’s The Liberated Don Quixote and Isaac Babel’s Red Cavalry.”

Professor Bettina Kaibach will read Lunacharsky’s play The Liberated Don Quixote and Babel’s Red Cavalry through the lens of Turgenev’s article Hamlet and Don Quixote. Both writers appropriated Turgenev’s ideas to grapple with issues raised by the revolution and ensuing Civil War and the Russian-Polish War, respectively. In her talk, Dr. Kaibach will show how, while harkening back to Turgenev’s essay, Lunacharsky and Babel each tailored its basic tenets to fit their own convictions, thus entering into a dialogue both with their predecessor and with each other. When read together, Turgenev’s essay and Lunacharsky’s play provide a key to unlock yet another hidden chamber of Babel’s enigmatic text that, like no other, captured the internal contradictions of the revolution.

Bettina Kaibach, PhD is a Special Lecturer in the Slavic Department of the University of Heidelberg, Germany. She teaches Russian, Czech, and Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian literature. Her research focuses on the many intersections between Slavic and Jewish Studies. She is also a translator of Russian and Czech literature.

Cosponsored by:

The Harriman Institute

The Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies

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04/01/2019 - 6:15pm
 
 
 
Dissertation Workshop: Inna Kapilevich

Dissertation Workshop: Inna Kapilevich

Thursday, April 4, 2019 - 4:00pm
Location: 
709 Hamilton Hall

Please come to a Dissertation Workshop presentation, featuring Inna Kapilevich, on Thursday, March 28th, from 4pm - 5pm, in 709 Hamilton Hall.

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04/04/2019 - 4:00pm
 
Women and Resistance in Russian Speaker Series - Irina Sandomirskaja

Women and Resistance in Russian Speaker Series - Irina Sandomirskaja

Thursday, April 4, 2019 - 6:15pm
Location: 
1219 International Affairs Building


Irina Sandomirskaja
 (Södertörn U, Sweden),

“Lidiya Ginzburg’s Testimony from Inside the Leningrad Siege: 

An Unreconciled Memory, an Unwanted Heritage, and a Challenge for Today”
 

The idea of resistance, which is the theme of this course, leads us directly into the world of heroic masculine imagination. In the writing of the French poet and hero of la Résistance René Char, we see his fellow men and women who are strong like Greek gods and invite Liberty herself to sit down to take a meal together. Char’s tragic ethos of resistance also informs his poetics, especially the poet’s relation to the truth: ”Between the world of reality and myself, there is none of that dreary impenetrability any more.” (Hypnos, No. 188)

In her notes from the time of Stalin’s terror and the siege of Leningrad, Lydia Ginzburg describes situations and behaviors that hardly qualify as resistance in Char’s understanding. Her protagonist and alter ego is a subject deprived of any pathos of virility. Caught in the deadly grips of famine, he (in fact, she, but referring to herself in the masculine gender) is not strong at all and has no meals to share, not even with Liberty. Ginzburg’s testament comes precisely from the domain of ”dreary impenetrability”: dark, cold, and empty Leningrad, the city of death.

Ginzburg rejects the tragic attitude and refuses to dispel the ambiguity that arises from her analyses. She remains unreconciled to the post-war celebratory memorialization of the blockade as a collective deed of patriotic heroism. This resistance to posterior mythologization is what makes her testimony so challenging nowadays, and the legacy in general after the Soviet generations so difficult to appropriate.

This event is supported by a grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York. 
The lecture series is convened by Professor Valentina Izmirlieva and co-sponsored by the Harriman Institute, the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality, the Office of the Dean of the Humanities, and the Columbia-Barnard Slavic Department.
 

Irina Sandomirskaja is a Professor in the School of Culture and Education and Centre for Baltic and East European Studies at Södertörn University, Sweden. She works on Soviet history and culture, language theory and philosophy, and critical theory and philosophy. Her books include Blokada v slove: ocherki kriticheskoi teorii i biopolitki iazyka, which was awarded the Andrei Bely Prize in 2013.

Thursday, April 4, 6:15-8:-15pm, 1219 IAB, Harriman Institute 

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04/04/2019 - 6:15pm
 
 
 
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The Wild Field, 2018

The Wild Field, 2018

Tuesday, April 9, 2019 - 7:00pm
Location: 
Deutsches Haus, Columbia University (420 West 116th Street (off Amsterdam Ave)

The Ukrainian Film Club at Columbia

will hold an unofficial North American premiere of

The Wild Field, 2018

director Yaroslav Lodyhin

Written by Serhii Zhadan, an internationally acclaimed Ukrainian poet and prose writer, in cooperation with Natalka Vorozhbyt and Yaroslav Lodyhin, this dramedy is a screen adaptation of Zhadan’s popular novel Voroshylovhrad. The old Soviet name of the present-day Ukrainian city of Luhansk, now under Russian occupation, is a metaphor of the colonial legacy Ukraine has been saddled with since the Soviet collapse. The action unfolds in a small town in the Donbas region. The film’s protagonist Hera reluctantly returns to his home town surrounded by the southern steppes, often referred to as the Wild Field, to tie up some loose ends. His elder brother goes mysteriously missing and now Hera is compelled to take over their small family business, an old money-losing gas station. Inadvertently he gets caught up in a dramatic showdown with local organized crime. Refusing to be cowed by thugs into surrendering his property, Hera ends up fighting for something bigger than just his business. Much like all his generation of Ukrainians he fights for human dignity, for the right to lead a life free from the corrosive legacies of the past.

Serhii Zhadan will be at the screening in person to discuss the film.

When: Tuesday, April 9, 2019, 7:00 PM

Where: Deutsches Haus, 420 West 116th St. (off Amsterdam Ave.)

 With English subtitles

Yuri Shevchuk will introduce the film and mediate the discussion

Free and open to the public

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04/09/2019 - 7:00pm
 
 
Lexical Layers of Identity in Slavic Languages Danko Šipka

Lexical Layers of Identity in Slavic Languages Danko Šipka

Thursday, April 11, 2019 - 4:00pm
Location: 
709 Hamilton Hall

Lexical Layers of Identity in Slavic Languages

Danko Šipka 

 

Focusing on Slavic languages, Danko Šipka provides a systematic approach to lexical indicators of cultural identity, postulating the following three layers: deep, exchange, and surface. The deep layer pertains to culture-specific words, divisions, and features that are generally not subject to change and intervention. The exchange layer includes lexical markers of cultural influences resulting from lexical borrowing, which situates the speakers into various cultural circles. This layer is subject to gradual changes and some limited level of intervention from linguistic elites is possible. Finally, the surface layer encompasses the processes and consequences of lexical planning. It is subject to abrupt changes and it is shaped in constant negotiation between linguistic elites and general body of speakers.

Danko Šipka is a professor of Slavic languages and head of the German, Slavic, and Romanian Faculty at Arizona State University, where he teaches Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, Polish, and Slavic linguistics in the School of International Letters and Cultures. He also holds a titular (presidential) professorship conferred upon him by the president of the Republic of Poland. His previous experience includes stints at the universities of Sarajevo, Belgrade, Poznan, Wroclaw, Warsaw, the Jagiellonian University, and the universities of Munich and Dusseldorf. He has also completed research fellowships at Hokkaido University and the Australian National University. Dr. Šipka served as a senior linguist or consultant to numerous language industry companies. He holds a Ph.D. in linguistics from the University of Belgrade, a doctorate in psychology from the Polish Academy of Sciences, and an M.A. in Russian from the University of Poznan. Prof. Šipka is an ACTFL-certified Oral Proficiency Tester for Polish and English and a certified interpreter for the IRS, Homeland Security Department, and the Department of Justice. He is also a regular evaluator for the American Council on Education and the Department of Education. He is currently president-elect of NFMLTA. Danko Šipka's research interests include lexicography, lexicology, lexical and inflectional morphology, computational linguistics, and computer-assisted language learning. His publications encompass over 150 papers and reviews as well as 30 books. His most recent monograph is titled Lexical Layers of Identity (Cambridge University Press, 2019 forthcoming).

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04/11/2019 - 4:00pm
 
POPULISTS, REFORMERS, RUSSIAN SOFT POWER AND WAR: UKRAINE'S 2019 ELECTIONS

POPULISTS, REFORMERS, RUSSIAN SOFT POWER AND WAR: UKRAINE'S 2019 ELECTIONS

Thursday, April 11, 2019 - 4:15pm
Location: 
Marshall D. Shulman Seminar Room, 1219 International Affairs Building (420 W 118th St)

Please join the Ukrainian Studies Program at the Harriman Institute, Columbia University for a presentation by Taras Kuzio (National University of Kyivan Mohyla Academy, Foreign Policy Institute, Johns Hopkins University - SAIS).

Five years Ukraine after the Euromaidan Revolution of Dignity, Ukraine held presidential in March and will hold parliamentary elections in October 2019.  The elections will not witness the traditional battle between 'pro-Western' and 'pro-Russian' forces because16% of traditionally pro-Russian voters and 27 election districts are under Russian occupation in the Crimea and Donbas, the Party of Regions no longer exists, and the Communist Party is banned.  Russia’s annexation of the Crimea, the on-going Russian-Ukrainian war in the Donbas and Azov Sea will provide the background to an election that will resemble those held those in Europe and the US where populists battle against reformers. With Russian soft power in Ukraine in terminal decline, as seen in the emergence of a Ukrainian Orthodox Church independent of Moscow, the 2019 elections will be a test if Ukraine's reforms and European integration will continue and prove to be irreversible by the 2024 elections.

Taras Kuzio received a BA in Economics from the University of Sussex, an MA in Soviet and East European Area Studies from the University of London, and a PhD in Political Science from the University of Birmingham, England, UK. Professor in the Department of Political Science, National University of Kyiv Mohyla Academy and Non-Resident Fellow at the Foreign Policy Institute, School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University, Washington DC. His previous positions were at the University of Alberta, George Washington University, University of Toronto, and Chief of Mission to the NATO Information and Documentation Office in Ukraine. Taras Kuzio is the author and editor of seventeen books, including (with Paul D’Anieri) The Sources of Russia's Great Power Politics: Ukraine and the Challenge to the European Order (2018), Putin’s War Against Ukraine. Revolution, Nationalism, and Crime (2017), Ukraine. Democratization, Corruption and the New Russian Imperialism (2015), From Kuchmagate to Orange Revolution (2009), and Theoretical and Comparative Perspectives on Nationalism (2007). Author of five think tank monographs, including The Crimea: Europe’s Next Flashpoint? (2010), 38 book chapters and 100 scholarly articles on Ukrainian and post-communist politics, democratic transitions, color revolutions, nationalism, and European integration. He has been the Guest Editor of Communist and Post-Communist StudiesEast European Politics and Society, Demokratizatsiya, Eurasian Geography and Economics, Nationalities Papers, Journal of Communist Studies and Transition Politics, and Problems of Post-Communism.

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04/11/2019 - 4:15pm
 
 
 
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Citizen Filmmakers. Stefan Bugryn and Steven Zelko

Citizen Filmmakers. Stefan Bugryn and Steven Zelko

Thursday, April 25, 2019 - 7:00pm
Location: 
Deutsches Haus, Columbia University (420 West 116th Street (off Amsterdam Ave)

 

The Ukrainian Film Club at Columbia will hold the event 
 
Citizen Filmmakers. Stefan Bugryn and Steven Zelko
 
This special event will feature the Australian film director Stefan Bugryn and producer Steven Zelko in person. Their documentary short “War Mothers. Unbreakable” is competing at 2019 Tribeca International Film Festival. The Melbourne-based filmmakers will show the first part of their documentary project “War Mothers,” 2017 about the grassroot response to the Russian war of aggression against Ukraine and discuss their experience shooting the events both on the war front and in the Ukrainian rear.
 
When: Thursday, April 25, 2019, 7:00 PM
Where: Deutsches Haus, 420 West 116th St.  (off Amsterdam Ave.)
 

Yuri Shevchuk will introduce the guests and mediate the discussion

The event is free and open to the public

“War Mothers” is the story of three women: Halyna, Svitlana, and Yulia. They live in the town of Zaporizhia, which is along the eastern front of the ongoing war in Ukraine. All three women are mothers, all three have felt the impacts of the war first hand, and all three have decided not to settle for the tragedy being dealt to themselves, to their country and it's people. They are mothers of war, they are War Mothers.

'Highly poetic & moving' - Time Out Australia
'Heartbreaking...not to be missed' - FilmDude

facebook.com/warmothers

To read the story behind the film: 

euromaidanpress.com/2017/06/03/how-i-left-everything-to-make-the-film-war-mothers-in-donbas/

For additional coverage: 

cinemaaustralia.com.au/2017/05/30/trailer-of-the-day-war-mothers/

Official IMDB Page: imdb.com/title/tt6940672/

 

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04/25/2019 - 7:00pm
 
 
 
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