Events Calendar

October 2019

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
29
30
1
2
3
4
5
 
 
 
 
*Indra’s Net: Time in Arkady Dragomoshchenko’s Novels*

*Indra’s Net: Time in Arkady Dragomoshchenko’s Novels*

Thursday, October 3, 2019 - 6:15pm
Location: 
Ella Weed Room, 223 MILBANK Hall, West 119th St. and Broadway, Barnard College

Indra’s Net: Time in Arkady Dragomoshchenko’s Novels 
Evgeny Pavlov
University of Canterbury, New Zealand

The talk will focus on two experimental books of prose by the Russian poet
Arkady Dragomoshchenko (1946-2012), *Raspolozhenie v domakh i
dereviakh *[Disposition among Houses and Trees] (1978) and *Kitaiskoe solntse* [Chinese Sun] (1997). Even though he insisted on calling both these books “novels,” Dragomoshchenko was equally insistent on there being no difference between poetry and prose. Time and memory are central to both texts as they are to the entire corpus of Dragomoshchenko’s writing. The earlier novel, written before “the linguistic turn” in Dragomoshchenko’s poetry in the mid-1980s and originally available only in a small handful of typewritten samizdat copies, finally came out in book form in 2019. Its publication makes it
possible to trace the evolution of Dragomoshchenko’s strategy of the poetic narrative from the relatively conventional, if discontinuous, Raspolozhenie to the radically disjointed Kitaiskoe solntse whose fabric woven out of childhood memories, half-forgotten dreams, and unconnected, barely comprehensible plot lines, is held together by gaps in memory and understanding, baring the (non)space between the consciousness and the body in which the axes of the future and the past intersect. This fabric is akin to Indra’s endless net where each jewel reflects all other jewels and is in turn reflected in each and every one of them.
 

 

Sponsored by Barnard Slavic Department and the Harriman Institute at Columbia University. Light refreshments will be served.

 

Add to calendar Add to Google Calendar
10/03/2019 - 6:15pm
 
 
 
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
 
Envisioning Ukrainian Literature 2019: Versions and Demarcations, Part II

Envisioning Ukrainian Literature 2019: Versions and Demarcations, Part II

Monday, October 7, 2019 - 4:15pm
Location: 
Marshall D. Shulman Seminar Room, 1219 International Affairs Building (420 W 118th St)

Envisioning Ukrainian Literature 2019: Versions and Demarcations, Part II

Monday, October 7, 2019
4:10pm
Marshall D. Shulman Seminar Room, 1219 International Affairs Building (420 W 118th St)

Please join the Ukrainian Studies Program at the Harriman Institute for a panel moderated by Mark Andryczyk featuring Olena JenningsAlexander J. MotylDzvinia Orlowsky, and Irene Zabytko.

What are the different ways that Ukrainian literature can be defined in 2019? Literature written in the Ukrainian language? Literature written by citizens of Ukraine in any language? Literature written in Ukrainian outside of Ukraine? Literature written by Ukrainians living outside of Ukraine, in any language? Literature written about Ukrainians in any language? This event gathers a panel of writers and scholars to present their literary works and to discuss various ways of belonging to Ukrainian literature.

Olena Jennings is the author of Songs from an Apartment (Underground Books, 2017) and Memory Project (Underground Books, 2018.)  Her translations of Ukrainian poetry appear in the anthology Words for War (Academic Studies Press, 2017, in collaboration with Oksana Lutsyshyna), the anthology White Chalk of Days (Academic Studies Press, 2017,) Poetry International, and Wolf.   Her translations of Iryna Shuvalova’s poetry collection Pray to the Empty Wheels in collaboration with the author, will be released in fall 2019 by Lost Horse Press. She is 2018 recipient of a New Work Grant from the Queens Council of the Arts.  She is the curator of the Poets of Queens reading series.

Alexander J. Motyl (b. 1953, New York) is a writer, painter, and professor. Nominated for the Pushcart Prize in 2008 and 2013, he is the author of nine novels, Whiskey PriestWho Killed Andrei WarholFlippancyThe Jew Who Was UkrainianMy OrchidiaSweet SnowFall RiverVovochkaArdor, and a collection of poetry, Vanishing Points. Motyl’s artwork has been shown in solo and group shows in New York City, Philadelphia, and Toronto and is part of the permanent collection of two museums. He teaches at Rutgers University-Newark and is the author of seven academic books and numerous articles. Motyl lives in New York City. His biography may be found on Wikipedia.

Ukrainian-American poet, editor, and translator, Dzvinia Orlowsky is a Pushcart prize recipient and founding editor (1993-2001) of Four Way Books.  She is author of six poetry collections published by Carnegie Mellon University Press including Convertible Night, Flurry of Stones (2009) for which she received a Sheila Motton Book Award; Silvertone (2013) for which she was named Ohio Poetry Day Association's 2014 Co-Poet of the Year, and her most recent, Bad Harvest published in October, 2018. Her first collection, A Handful of Bees, was reprinted in 2009 as part of the Carnegie Mellon University Classic Contemporary Series.  In 2006 House Between Water published her translation from Ukrainian of The Enchanted Desna by Alexander Dovzhenko.  Dzvinia’s work has appeared in numerous anthologies including Nasty Women Poets: An Unapologetic Anthology of Subversive Verse (Lost Horse Press, 2017); Nothing Short of 100: Selected tales from 100 Word Story (Outpost19, 2018); Plume Anthologies 2-6A Hundred Years of Youth: A Bilingual Anthology of 20th Century Ukrainian Poetry (Lviv, 2000); and From Three Worlds: New Writing from the Ukraine (Zephyr Press, 1996). Dzvinia teaches at the Solstice Low-Residency MFA in Creative Writing of Pine Manor College, Providence College, and is founding director of “Night Riffs:  A Solstice Magazine Reading and Music Series.”

Irene Zabytko is a writer, filmmaker, and teacher. She has completed her 2016-2017 tenure as a Fulbright U.S. Scholar Award in Ukraine where she was doing research on her next novel based on the life of the 19th century writer, Nikolai Gogol. While there, she was also the English translator for the forthcoming non-fiction book: Russia’s Hybrid Aggression: Lessons for the World  Yevhen Mahda (Kalamar Publishing House, Kyiv, Ukraine). Zabytko’s first book, The Sky Unwashed (Algonquin Books, 2000), is a novel about Chornobyl (Ukrainian transliteration) and the evacuees who returned to their irradiated villages. She is producing, writing and co-directing a documentary about the real life Chornobyl survivors called Life In the Dead Zone (www.lifeinthedeadzone.com), and has completed a related award winning film short, Epiphany At Chornobyl which was streamed world-wide throughout 2016 on The Culture Unplugged Film Festival (http://www.cultureunplugged.com/storyteller/Irene_Zabytko)Her second book, the short story collection When Luba Leaves Home (Algonquin Books, 2003) is based on the Ukrainian community in her Chicago neighborhood. Her latest book, The Fictions Prescription: How to Write and Improve Your Fiction Like the Great Literary Masters is a non-fiction collection of her lectures, techniques and wisdom for writing literary fiction and accompaniment for her online writing classes and blogs (“An American Writer in Ukraine”) featured on www.irenezabytko.com. Her academic credentials include an M.F.A. in Creative Writing from Vermont College. She teaches fiction and creative non-fiction at Gotham Writers’ Workshop.

Mark Andryczyk, born in Philadelphia, USA, has a PhD in Ukrainian Literature from the University of Toronto (2005). His monograph The Intellectual as Hero in 1990s Ukrainian Fiction was published by the University of Toronto Press in 2012. A Ukrainian edition of that monograph, Intelektual iak heroi ukrains’koi prozy 90-kh rokiv XX stolittia was published by Piramida in 2014.  Since 2008, he has administrated the Ukrainian Studies Program at the Harriman Institute, Columbia University and has taught Ukrainian literature at its Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures. He is a translator of Ukrainian literature into English. In 2008-2017 he organized the Contemporary Ukrainian Literature Series (cosponsored by the Harriman and Kennan Institutes), which brought leading Ukrainian literary figures to audiences in North America. Andryczyk is editor and compiler of The White Chalk of Days, the Contemporary Ukrainian Literature Series Anthology (Academic Studies Press, 2017). He has translated eleven essays by Yuri Andrukhovych for the publication My Final Territory: Selected Essays (University of Toronto Press, 2018). Under the name Yeezhak, he has recorded three studio albums in Ukraine (1996, 1998, 2006) and has performed a series of concerts in support of these recordings, most recently at the Pidzemnyi Perekhid Vagabundo (Ivano-Frankivsk), in August 2019.

 

Add to calendar Add to Google Calendar
10/07/2019 - 4:15pm
 
 
 
 
 
 
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
 
 
 
ZOOLOGY (2016)

ZOOLOGY (2016)

Wednesday, October 16, 2019 - 7:30pm
Location: 
417 MATH

Directed by Ivan I Tverdovsky. 83 min.
An allegory of alienation and a devastating comedy about a society where being different is forbidden.

Add to calendar Add to Google Calendar
10/16/2019 - 7:30pm
 
Remaining a Ukrainian Woman: Normative Femininity as "Armor" in the Gulag

Remaining a Ukrainian Woman: Normative Femininity as "Armor" in the Gulag

Thursday, October 17, 2019 - 12:00pm
Location: 
Marshall D. Shulman Seminar Room, 1219 International Affairs Building (420 W 118th St)

Remaining a Ukrainian Woman: Normative Femininity as "Armor" in the Gulag

Thursday, October 17, 2019
12:00pm
Marshall D. Shulman Seminar Room, 1219 International Affairs Building (420 W 118th St)

Please join the Ukrainian Studies Program at the Harriman Institute, Columbia University for a presentation by Oksana Kis (National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine).

In the 1940-50s, tens of thousands of Ukrainian women were sentenced to long-term imprisonment in the Gulag for political charges. Their experiences of living in the most brutal conditions of the Soviet camps have not yet been the subject of special historical-anthropological research. This paper examines the personal memoires of Ukrainian female former prisoners of the Gulag in order to reveal women’s gendered behaviors and daily practices that sought to preserve their gender identities and thus counteract the dehumanizing effects of the camps. Some traditional women’s activities (housekeeping, singing, embroidering, religious celebrations, body care, etc.) which constituted core elements of the traditional concept of normative femininity were secretly practiced in the camps despite prohibitions and a lack of resources. They are considered gendered forms of non-violent resistance to the dehumanizing camp regime.

Oksana Kis is a historian and anthropologist, a Senior Research Fellow at the Institute of Ethnology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine in Lviv. She obtained her academic degree “kandydat nauk” (Ph.D. equivalent) from the Ivan Krypyakevych Institute of Ukrainian Studies, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine in 2002. In April 2017, she successfully defended her habilitation thesis for an academic degree of full doctor of sciences. The areas of her expertise include Ukrainian women’s history in the 19th and 20th centuries, feminist anthropology, oral history, and gender transformations in post-socialist countries. Dr. Kis is a founder and the President of the Ukrainian Association for Research in Women's History (since 2010). She is also a co-founder and the vice-president of the Ukrainian Oral History Association. Her first book Women in Ukrainian Traditional Culture in the second half of the 19h and early 20th centuries (in Ukrainian) came out in Lviv in 2008 (2nd edition 2012). Her recent book Ukrainian Women in the Gulag: The Victory of Survival (in Ukrainian) was published in 2017. Oksana Kis is Editor-in-Chief of the academic web-site Ukraina Moderna and a member of the editorial team of Aspasia: The International Yearbook of Central, Eastern, and Southeastern European Women's and Gender History.

 

Add to calendar Add to Google Calendar
10/17/2019 - 12:00pm
 
 
 
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
 
A Human with a Stool (2019)

A Human with a Stool (2019)

Monday, October 21, 2019 - 7:00pm
Location: 
Deutsches Haus, Columbia University (420 West 116th Street (off Amsterdam Ave)

Ukrainian Film Club @ Columbia University will screen

 

 

A Human with a Stool, 2019

director Leonid Kanter

      A group of travelers sets off on a journey with the aim to bring a stool from an ordinary Kyiv kitchen to Cape Horn and place it on the coast of the Pacific Ocean. The initiator of the journey Leonid Kanter, his wife Diana and their daughter Magdalena take part in the expedition among other members of the group. Leonid is filming their adventure, turning his life into a movie in which he becomes both the protagonist and director. Coming back home, the travelers are caught up in the outbreak of the Russian war of aggression against Ukraine. This film was initially planned as a manifesto of the invincible power of human dreams. But life intervened in the process of the filmmaking. Or, to be more precise, it was the last journey itself that the brave traveler decided to go on.

 

When: Monday, October 21, 2019, 7:00 PM

Where: Deutsches Haus, 420 West 116th St.

(off Amsterdam Ave.)

 In Ukrainian and Russian with English subtitles

 

Yuri Shevchuk will introduce the film and mediate the discussion

Add to calendar Add to Google Calendar
10/21/2019 - 7:00pm
 
 
Beshoot (2019)

Beshoot (2019)

Wednesday, October 23, 2019 - 7:00pm
Location: 
Deutsches Haus, Columbia University (420 West 116th Street (off Amsterdam Ave)

The Ukrainian Film Club @ Columbia will hold

the US premiere of

Beshoot, 2019

 

 

with director Ivan Tymchenko and

producer Svitlana Solovyova in attendance

 

        

The soldiers of the Donbas Volunteer Battalion are at the center of this war drama inspired by real-life events. Two Ukrainian fighters who, with thousands of others volunteered to repel the Russian aggression against their homeland are trying to get out of the Russian-surrounded Ilovaisk, a city in south-western Ukraine. Beshoot the latest example of citizen-filmmaking made without government funding. Theatrically released in Ukraine under the title Ilovaisk 2014 in early September the film was enthusiastically received by viewers.  Be the first one to see it in the US and discuss the film with its director and producer.

 

When: Wednesday, October 23, 2019, 7:00 PM

Where: Deutsches Haus, 420 West 116th St.

(off Amsterdam Ave.)

 In Ukrainian and Russian with English subtitles

 

Yuri Shevchuk will introduce the Ukrainian filmmakers and mediate the post-screening discussion

 

Link to the trailer:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aNNLKMRyeSI

 

Link to the film website:  http://beshoot.film

Add to calendar Add to Google Calendar
10/23/2019 - 7:00pm
 
 
 
 
27
28
29
30
31
1
2
 
 
 
SUMMER (2018)

SUMMER (2018)

Wednesday, October 30, 2019 - 7:30pm
Location: 
417 MATH

Directed by Kirill Serebrennikov. 126 min.
Leningrad, summer of 1984. Young Victor Tsoi rises to fame during the time of underground concerts, smuggled LPs of Lou Reed and Blondie, and of course, the Leningrad Rock Club.

Add to calendar Add to Google Calendar
10/30/2019 - 7:30pm
 
‘Interdisciplinary Slavic Conference Workshop'

‘Interdisciplinary Slavic Conference Workshop'

Thursday, October 31, 2019 - 4:00pm
Location: 
709 Hamilton Hall

In preparation for upcoming conferences, this workshop is an opportunity for scholars from various disciplines within Slavic studies (i.e. Russian language and literature, History, Comparative Literature) to showcase and discuss their work in an informal setting. 

 
Add to calendar Add to Google Calendar
10/31/2019 - 4:00pm
 
 
 
Add to Google Calendar